Biography •  Chicano/Chicana and Southwest

$19.95 paperback
978-0-8263-4635-3


Sweet Nata: Growing Up in Rural New Mexico


Gloria Zamora

Winner of the 2010 Premio Aztlán Literary Prize

Grandparents are our teachers, our allies, and a great source of love. They supply endless stories that connect us to a past way of life and to people long gone-people who led ordinary lives, but were full of extraordinary teachings. This is the subject of Sweet Nata, a memoir about familial traditions and the joys and hardships the author experienced in her youth. Set during the 1950s and 1960s in Mora and Corrales, New Mexico, Zamora reveals her interaction with her parents, grandparents, and other extended family members who had the greatest influence on her life. She paints a picture of native New Mexican culture and history for younger generations that will also be nostalgic for older generations.

"Zamora offers a unique and authentic perspective on the Hispanic experience in New Mexico. As a memoir, it's a rare glimpse into the daily living of a family and a community."--Ana Baca, author of Mama Fela's Girls (UNM Press)


ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

Gloria Zamora lives in Corrales, New Mexico. Her short stories about family, culture, and heritage have appeared in La Herencia Magazine.

ACCLAIM

"...a charming book..."

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Multicultural Review



"By capturing everyday moments of her childhood, Zamora has also captured snapshots of northern New Mexico's cultural heritage and the unbreakable bonds between family members who always love you 'porque sí' (just because)."

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New Mexico Magazine



"...Gloria Zamora's elegantly understated memoir...captures the essence of a way of life gone by."

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Su Casa Magazine



"An eminently readable account, highly recommended."

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Midwest Book Review



"Gloria Zamora's memoir is a sweet cream for readers to share in the author's memories of her early years spent with Granma Ninfa and Granpa Fidel in Mora County....Her recollections lovingly, poignantly, and sometimes humorously fill every page."

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Albuquerque Journal




6 x 9 in. 240 pages 25 halftones