History •  Politics and Latin America

$55.00 / Online Sale Price $41.25 hardcover
978-0-8263-5165-4

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Beyond Geopolitics: New Histories of Latin America at the League of Nations


Edited by Alan McPherson
Edited by Yannick Wehrli

Even though it failed to prevent World War II, the League of Nations left a lasting legacy. This precedent-setting international organization created important institutions and initiatives in labor, economics, culture, science, and more, from the International Labor Organization to initiatives targeting education, taxation, nutrition, and other issues. Otherwise marginalized in global diplomacy, Latin Americans were involved, and often acted as leaders, in many League-related activities and made a number of positive contributions to the League. In this book foremost scholars from Europe and the Americas consider Latin American leadership and experiences in the League of Nations. Using research in frequently overlooked collections, Beyond Geopolitics makes groundbreaking contributions to the study of Latin American international relations, the history of the League of Nations, and the broader story of cooperation across borders.


ABOUT THE CONTRIBUTORS

Alan McPherson is a professor of international and area studies at the University of Oklahoma. Among his books are the prize-winning Yankee No! Anti-Americanism in U.S.-Latin American Relations and The Invaded: How Latin Americans and Their Allies Fought and Ended U.S. Occupations.

Yannick Wehrli was born in Geneva, Switzerland, and is a lecturer at the University of Geneva. Specializing in Latin American political and international history and in the history of international organizations, he has published a dozen articles and book chapters mainly related to Latin American participation at the League of Nations.

ACCLAIM

“A provocative and eclectic introduction to the complexities of early Latin American diplomacy and its history.”

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ReVista



“A welcome new collection that challenges the notion that the League of Nations was, as it has long been regarded, an exclusively European organization, relevant only to those who study a European metropole and its colonies.”

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H-Net Reviews




6 x 9 in. 304 pages 16 halftones