A School for Advanced Research Resident Scholar Book

Kenneth Chapman's Santa Fe

Artists and Archaeologists, 1907-1931: The Memoirs of Kenneth Chapman
Edited by Marit K. Munson

Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider's portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe.

The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems

Edited by Timothy KohlerSander E. van der Leeuw

How should archaeologists and other social scientists tackle the big and little questions about change in socionatural systems? Although fieldwork is certainly the place to start, it alone is not enough to answer troublesome "how" or "why" questions. To make sense of what they find in the field, archaeologists build models-possible explanations for the data.

Subjects: Archaeology

Half-Lives and Half-Truths

Confronting the Radioactive Legacies of the Cold War
Edited by Barbara Rose Johnston

The long Cold War of the twentieth century has ended, but only now are the poisonous legacies of that “first nuclear age” coming to light. Activists and anthropologists, the authors of this volume reveal the devastating, complex, and long-term environmental health problems afflicting the people who worked in uranium mining and processing, lived in regions dedicated to the construction of nuclear weapons or participated, often unknowingly, in radiation experiments.

Acequia

Water Sharing, Sanctity, and Place
By Sylvia Rodríguez

Every society must have a system for capturing, storing, and distributing water, a system encompassing both technology and a rationale for the division of this finite resource. Today, people around the world face severe and growing water scarcity, and everywhere this vital resource is ceasing to be a right and becoming a commodity.

Más Que un Indio (More than an Indian)

Racial Ambivalence and Neoliberal Multiculturalism in Guatemala
By Charles R. Hale

This deeply researched and sensitively rendered study raises troubling questions about the contradictions of anti-racist politics and the limits of multiculturalism in Guatemala and, by implication, other countries in the midst of similar reform projects.

Mimbres Painted Pottery

Revised Edition
By J. J. Brody

The Mimbres cultural florescence between about AD 1000 and AD 1140 remains one of the most visually astonishing and anthropologically intriguing questions in Southwest prehistory.

Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians

Expressions of New Life
Second Edition
By Jill D. Sweet

This expanded edition reflects these changes by featuring the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community. The author frames their words with her own poignant reflections on more than twenty years of study and friendship with these creative and enduring people.

The Flow of Power

Ancient Water Systems and Landscapes
By Vernon L. Scarborough

This book is the first longitudinal study to consider water management worldwide since Karl Wittfogel put forth his “hydraulic societies” hypothesis nearly two generations ago, and it draws together the diverse debates that seminal work inspired. In so doing, Scarborough offers new models for cross-cultural analysis and prepares the ground for new examinations of power, centralization, and the economy.

Subjects: Archaeology

Ambos Nogales

Intimate Portraits of the U.S.-Mexico Border
By Maeve HickeyLawrence Taylor

Evoking the startling contrasts, brutalities, radiant beauty, and resilient people, these astonishing duotone photographs and penetrating essays reveal the ironic embrace of Nogales. The would-be immigrant caught in the tunnel between Nogales, Sonora, and Nogales, Arizona, knows life is dangerous and surprising.

Subjects: HistorySouthwest

Yanomami Warfare

A Political History
By R. Brian Ferguson

Generations of college students know the Yanomami as the example of "natural" aggression in human society. These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present.

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