Diálogos Series

Kris Lane, Series Editor

Understanding Latin America demands dialogue, deep exploration, and frank discussion of key topics. Founded by Lyman L. Johnson in 1992 and edited since 2013 by Kris Lane, the Diálogos Series focuses on innovative scholarship in Latin American history and related fields. The series, the most successful of its type, includes specialist works accessible to a wide readership and a variety of thematic titles, all ideally suited for classroom adoption by university and college teachers.

Staging Frontiers

The Making of Modern Popular Culture in Argentina and Uruguay
By William Garrett Acree

In this expansive and engaging narrative William Acree guides readers through the deep history of popular entertainment before turning to circus culture and rural dramas that celebrated the countryside on stage.

A Woman, a Man, a Nation

Mariquita Sánchez, Juan Manuel de Rosas, an d the Beginnings of Argentina
By Jeffrey M. Shumway

Mariquita’s and Juan Manuel’s lives corresponded with the major events and processes that shaped the turbulent beginnings of the Argentine nation, many of which also shaped Latin America and the Atlantic World during the Age of Revolution (1750–1850).

The Origins of Macho

Men and Masculinity in Colonial Mexico
By Sonya Lipsett-Rivera

Lipsett-Rivera traces the genesis of the Mexican macho by looking at daily interactions between Mexican men in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries.

Mexico in the Time of Cholera

By Donald Fithian Stevens

The book takes the devastating 1833 cholera epidemic as its dramatic center and expands beyond this episode to explore love, lust, lies, and midwives.

Tides of Revolution

Information, Insurgencies, and the Crisis of Colonial Rule in Venezuela
By Cristina Soriano

This is a book about the links between politics and literacy, and about how radical ideas spread in a world without printing presses.

Mexico City, 1808

Power, Sovereignty, and Silver in an Age of War and Revolution
By John Tutino

Tutino offers a new vision of the political violence and social conflicts that led to the fall of silver capitalism and Mexican independence in 1821.

Murder in Mérida, 1792

Violence, Factions, and the Law
By Mark W. Lentz

This book recounts the mystery of the Gálvez murder and its resolution, an event that captured contemporaries’ imaginations throughout the Hispanic world and caused consternation on the part of authorities in both Mexico and Madrid.

Nuns Navigating the Spanish Empire

By Sarah E. Owens

Nuns Navigating the Spanish Empire tells the remarkable story of a group of nuns who traveled halfway around the globe in the seventeenth century to establish the first female Franciscan convent in the Far East.

The Pursuit of Ruins

Archaeology, History, and the Making of Modern Mexico
By Christina Bueno

The Pursuit of Ruins argues that the government effort to take control of the ancient remains in Mexico took off in the late nineteenth century during the dictatorship of Porfirio Díaz.

Sons of the Mexican Revolution

Miguel Alemán and His Generation
By Ryan M. Alexander

Using a wide array of new archival sources, Alexander demonstrates that the transformative political decisions made by civilian government officials, after the 1946 election, represented both their collective values as a generation and their effort to adapt those values to the realities of the Cold War.

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