School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar Series

Muslim Youth and the 9/11 Generation

Edited by Adeline MasquelierBenjamin F. Soares

The contributors to this volume—who draw from a variety of disciplines—show how the study of Muslim youth at this particular historical juncture is relevant to thinking about the anthropology of youth, the anthropology of Islamic and Muslim societies, and the post-9/11 world more generally.

Childhood

Origins, Evolution, and Implications
Edited by Courtney L. MeehanAlyssa N. Crittenden

This collection is the first to specifically address our current understanding of the evolution of human childhood, which in turn significantly affects our interpretations of the evolution of family formation, social organization, cultural transmission, cognition, ontogeny, and the physical and socioemotional needs of children.

Subjects: Anthropology

Linking the Histories of Slavery

North America and Its Borderlands
Edited by Bonnie MartinJames F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser-known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

Artisans and Advocacy in the Global Market

Walking the Heart Path
Edited by Jeanne SimonelliKatherine O’DonnellJune Nash

Contributors to this book explore how crafts — pottery, weaving, basketmaking, storytelling — in Middle America and beyond are a means of making an intangible cultural heritage visible, material, and enduring. Each contribution shows how social science research can evolve into advocacy, collaboration, and friendship.

Subjects: Anthropology

Disturbing Bodies

Perspectives on Forensic Anthropology
Edited by Zoë CrosslandRosemary A. Joyce

The theme of “disturbing bodies” has a double valence, evoking both the work that anthropologists do and also the ways in which the dead can, in turn, disturb the living through their material qualities, through dreams and other forms of presence, and through the political claims often articulated around them.

Subjects: Anthropology

Things in Motion

Object Itineraries in Anthropological Practice
Edited by Rosemary A. JoyceSusan D. Gillespie

Complementing the concept of object biography, the contributors to this volume use the complex construct of “itineraries” to trace the places in which objects come to rest or are active, the routes through which things circulate, and the means by which they are moved.

Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability

Edited by Nancy N. ChenLesley A. Sharp

“Biosecurity” has ballooned into an increasingly mundane aspect of human experience, serving as a catchall for the detection, surveillance, containment, and deflection of everything from epidemics and natural disasters to resource scarcities and political insurgencies.

Katherine Dunham

Recovering an Anthropological Legacy, Choreographing Ethnographic Futures
Edited by Elizabeth Chin

This book explores Katherine Dunham’s contribution to anthropology and the ongoing relevance of her ideas and methodologies, rejecting the idea that art and academics need to be cleanly separated from each other.

Subjects: Anthropology

(Mis)managing Migration

Guestworkers' Experiences with North American Labor Markets
Edited by David Griffith

Today managed migration is growing in North America. This mirrors the general growth of migration from poorer to richer countries, with more than 200 million people now living outside their natal countries. Faced with this phenomenon, managed migration enables nation-states to regulate those population movements; direct foreign nationals to specific, identified economic sectors that citizens are less likely to care about; match employers who claim labor shortages with highly motivated workers; and offer people from poorer countries higher earning potential abroad through temporary absence from their families and homelands.

Subjects: Anthropology

Cash on the Table

Markets, Values, and Moral Economies
Edited by Edward F. Fischer

A great deal is at stake in understanding the moral dimensions of economic behavior and markets. Public debates over executive compensation, the fair trade movement, and recent academic inquiries into the limitations of rational-choice paradigms all point to the relevance of moral values in our economic decision-making processes. Moral values inform economic behavior.

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