School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar Series

Vital Relations

Modernity and the Persistent Life of Kinship
Edited by Susan McKinnonFenella Cannell

For more than 150 years, theories of social evolution, development, and modernity have been unanimous in their assumption that kinship organizes simpler, “traditional,” pre-state societies but not complex, “modern,” state societies. And these theories have been unanimous in their presupposition that within modern state-based societies kinship has been relegated to the domestic domain, has lost its economic and political functions, has retained no organizing force in modern political and economic structures and processes, and has become secularized and rationalized. Vital Relations challenges these notions.

Subjects: Anthropology

Images That Move

Edited by Patricia SpyerMary Margaret Steedly

Images play a significant part in projects of “poetic world-making” and political transformation. They participate in the production of commensuration or of incommensurability, enact moments of prophecy or exposure, and attract or repel spectators’ attention. But any examination of images in motion must also recognize the blockages and breakdowns that prevent their movement, as well as the enframings or “stickinesses” that trap them in particular places and prevent them from reaching others.

Subjects: Anthropology

Reassembling the Collection

Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency
Edited by Rodney HarrisonSarah ByrneAnne Clarke

Reassembling the Collection presents innovative approaches to the study of historical and contemporary engagements between museums and the various individuals and communities who were (and are) involved in their production and consumption.

Subjects: Anthropology

Big Histories, Human Lives

Tackling Problems of Scale in Archaeology
Edited by John RobbTimothy R. Pauketat

The contributors consider something archaeologists seldom think about: the intersection of micro-scale human experience with large-scale and long-term histories.

Subjects: Archaeology

Keystone Nations

Indigenous Peoples and Salmon across the North Pacific
Edited by Benedict J. ColombiJames F. Brooks

The histories and futures of Indigenous peoples and salmon are inextricably bound across the vast ocean expanse and rugged coastlines of the North Pacific. Keystone Nations addresses this enmeshment and the marriage of the biological and social sciences that have led to the research discussed in this book.

Subjects: Anthropology

The Global Middle Classes

Theorizing through Ethnography
Edited by Rachel HeimanCarla FreemanMark Liechty

Surging middle-class aspirations and anxieties throughout the world have recently compelled anthropologists to pay serious attention to middle classes and middle-class spaces, sentiments, lifestyles, labors, and civic engagements.

Nature, Science, and Religion

Intersections Shaping Society and the Environment
Edited by Catherine M. Tucker

This book is about the complicated and provocative ways nature, science, and religion intersect in real settings where people attempt to live in harmony with the physical environment. The contributors explore how scientific knowledge and spiritual beliefs are engaged to shape natural resource management, environmental activism, and political processes.

The Shape of Script

How and Why Writing Systems Change
Edited by Stephen D. Houston

This book builds on earlier projects about the origins and extinctions of script traditions throughout the world in an effort to address the fundamental questions of how and why writing systems change. The contributors—who study ancient scripts from Arabic to Roman, from Bronze Age China to Middle Kingdom Egypt—utilize an approach that views writing less as a technology than as a mode of communication, one that is socially learned and culturally transmitted.

Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death

Contemporary Approaches to Bioarchaeology
Edited by Aubrey BaadsgaardAlexis T. BoutinJane E. Buikstra

Taking cues from current theoretical perspectives and capitalizing on the strengths of new and sophisticated methods of analysis, Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death showcases the vibrancy of bioarchaeological research and its potential for bringing “new life” to the field of mortuary archaeology and the study of human remains.

Dangerous Liaisons

Anthropologists and the National Security State
Edited by Laura A. McNamaraRobert A. Rubinstein

Dangerous Liaisons is a book about intersections. It is a product of two year’s worth of discussion among a group of ethnographers from four different countries studying war, violence, the military, and the state.

Subjects: Anthropology

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