School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar Series

Global Health in Times of Violence

Edited by Barbara Rylko-BauerLinda WhitefordPaul Farmer

Over 24 million people have died in these conflicts, and millions more suffered illness and injury. In this volume, leading scholars and practitioners examine the impact of structural, military, and communal violence on health, psychosocial well-being, and health care delivery. By investigating the fields of violence that define our modern world, the authors are able to provide alternative global health paradigms that can be used to develop more effective policies and programs.

Development and Dispossession

The Crisis of Forced Displacement and Resettlement
Edited by Anthony Oliver-Smith

Resettlement has been so poorly planned, financed, implemented, and administered that these projects end up being “development disasters.” Because there can be no return to land submerged under a dam-created lake or to a neighborhood buried under a stadium or throughway, the solutions devised to meet the needs of people displaced by development must be durable. The contributors to this volume analyze the failures of existing resettlement policies and propose just such durable solutions.

Confronting Cancer

Metaphors, Advocacy, and Anthropology
Edited by Juliet McMullinDiane Weiner

In this book, anthropologists examine the lived experiences of individuals confronting cancer and reveal the social context in which prevention and treatment may succeed or fail.

Subjects: Anthropology

Democracy

Anthropological Approaches
Edited by Julia Paley

While previous scholars of democracy have proposed one definitive model after another, the authors in this work suggest that democracy is by nature an open ended set of questions about the workings of power—questions best engaged through the dialogical processes of fieldwork and ethnographic writing.

Timely Assets

The Politics of Resources and Their Temporalities
Edited by Elizabeth Emma FerryMandana E. Limbert

Oil is running out. What’s more, its final depletion, once relegated to a misty future, now seems imminent. In all the more or less apocalyptic discussions of oil and similar depleted resources, nature, labor, and time converge. This volume focuses on how resources, resource-making, and resource-claiming are entangled with experiences of time.

Subjects: Anthropology

Figuring the Future

Globalization and the Temporalities of Children and Youth
Edited by Jennifer ColeDeborah Durham

Child laborers in South Asia, child soldiers in Sierra Leone and Uganda, Chinese youth playing computer games to earn virtual gold, youth involved in sex trafficking in the former Soviet republics and Thailand: these are just some of the young people featured in the news of late. To address how and why youth and children have come to seem so important to globalization, the contributors to this book look at the both the spatial relations and the temporal dimensions of globalization in places as far apart as Oakland, California, and Tamatave, Madagascar, in situations as disparate as the idealization of childhood innocence and the brutal lives of street children.

Memory Work

Archaeologies of Material Practices
Edited by Barbara J. MillsWilliam H. Walker

Memory making is a social practice that links people and things together across time and space and ultimately has material consequences. The intersection of matter and social practice becomes archaeologically visible through the deposits created during social activities. The contributors to this volume share a common goal to map out the different ways in which to study social memories in past societies programmatically and tangibly.

Subjects: Archaeology

Small Worlds

Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory
Edited by James F. BrooksChristopher R. N. DeCorseJohn Walton

Growing unease with grand theories of modernization and global integration brought twelve scholars from four disciplines to the School for Advanced Research for an experiment with the research genre known as microhistory. These authors now call for a return to narrative, detailed analysis on a small scale, and the search for unforeseen meanings embedded in cases.

Opening Archaeology

Repatriation's Impact on Contemporary Research and Practice
Edited by Thomas W. Killion

In 1989–90, Congress enacted two laws, the National Museum of the American Indian Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, that required museums and other repositories of Native American human remains and cultural items to consult with, share information about, and return some items to federally recognized Indian tribes and Native Alaskan and Hawaiian communities.

New Landscapes of Inequality

Neoliberalism and the Erosion of Democracy in America
Edited by Jane L. CollinsMicaela di LeonardoBrett Williams

Focusing on the United States, the contributors to this volume analyze how the globalization of newly untrammeled capitalism has exacerbated preexisting inequalities, how the retreat of the benevolent state and the rise of the punitive, imperial state are related, how poorly privatized welfare institutions provide services, how neoliberal and neoconservative ideologies are melding, and how recurrent moral panics misrepresent class, race, gendered, and sexual realities on the ground.

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