School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar Series

The Gender of Globalization

Women Navigating Cultural and Economic Marginalities
Edited by Nandini GunewardenaAnn Kingsolver

As “globalization” moves rapidly from buzzword to cliché, evaluating the claims of neoliberal capitalism to empower and enrich remains urgently important. The authors in this volume employ feminist, ethnographic methods to examine what free trade and export processing zones, economic liberalization, and currency reform mean to women in Argentina, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Ghana, the United States, India, Jamaica, and many other places.

Imperial Formations

Edited by Ann Laura StolerCarole McGranahanPeter C. Perdue

The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies.

The Evolution of Human Life History

Edited by Kristen HawkesRichard R. Paine

Human beings may share 98 percent of their genetic makeup with their nonhuman primate cousins, but they have distinctive life histories. When and why did these uniquely human patterns evolve? To answer that question, this volume brings together specialists in hunter-gatherer behavioral ecology and demography, human growth, development, and nutrition, paleodemography, human paleontology, primatology, and the genomics of aging.

Subjects: Anthropology

The Seductions of Community

Emancipations, Oppressions, Quandaries
Edited by Gerald W. Creed

The concept of "community" is ubiquitous in the way we talk and think about life in the twenty-first century. Political and economic projects from rain forest conservation to urban empowerment zones focus on "the community" as the appropriate vehicle and target of change.

Subjects: Anthropology

Afro-Atlantic Dialogues

Anthropology in the Diaspora
Edited by Kevin A. Yelvington

This book breaks new theoretical and methodological ground in the study of the African diaspora in the Atlantic world. Leading scholars of archaeology, linguistics, and socio-cultural anthropology draw upon extensive field experiences and archival investigations of black communities in North America, the Caribbean, South America, and Africa to challenge received paradigms in Afro-American anthropology.

Subjects: Anthropology

The Archaeology of Chaco Canyon

An Eleventh-Century Pueblo Regional Center
Edited by Stephen H. Lekson

The site of a great Ancestral Pueblo center in the 11th and 12th centuries AD, the ruins in Chaco Canyon look like a city to some archaeologists, a ceremonial center to others. Chaco and the people who created its monumental great houses, extensive roads, and network of outlying settlements remain an enigma in American archaeology.

Community Building in the Twenty-First Century

Edited by Stanley E. Hyland

“Community” has long been a critical concept for social scientists, and never more so amid the growing economic inequity, natural and human disasters, and warfare of the opening years of the twenty-first century. In this volume, leading scholar-activists develop a conceptual framework for both the theory and practice of building communities.

Subjects: Anthropology

Globalization, Water, and Health

Resource Management in Times of Scarcity
Edited by Linda WhitefordScott Whiteford

This book is about crime and passion, life and death, lofty goals and squalid realities. It is a book about water. Global disparities in health and access to water are two major threats to world stability.

Copán

The History of an Ancient Maya Kingdom
Edited by E. Wyllys AndrewsWilliam L. Fash

This volume collects leading scholarship on one of the most important archaeological complexes in the ancient Maya world. The authors-internationally renowned experts who participated in the long-running Copán Acropolis Archaeological Project-address enduring themes in Maya archaeology.

The Archaeology of Colonial Encounters

Comparative Perspectives
Edited by Gil J. Stein

Colonialism and its legacies have emerged as one of the most important research topics in anthropology. Indeed, we now understand that colonialism gave rise to and shaped the discipline. However, the understanding of colonization in anthropology, history, and other fields derives largely from studies of European expansion.

Subjects: Archaeology

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