School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar Series

Pluralizing Ethnography

Comparison and Representation in Maya Cultures, Histories, and Identities
Edited by John M. WatanabeEdward F. Fischer

This volume brings together eight Maya specialists and a prominent anthropological theorist as discussant to assess the contrasting historical circumstances and emerging cultural futures of Maya in Mexico and Guatemala.

Law and Empire in the Pacific

Fiji and Hawai`i
Edited by Sally Engle MerryDonald Brenneis

Focusing on the intimate relationship between law, culture, and the production of social knowledge, these essays re-center law in social theory. The authors analyze the transition from chiefdom to capitalism, colonizers’ racial and governmental ideologies, land and labor policies, and contemporary efforts to recuperate indigenous culture and assert or maintain indigenous sovereignty. Speaking to Fijian and Hawaiian circumstances, this volume illuminates the role of legal and archival practice in constructing ethnic and political identities and producing colonial and anthropological knowledge.

Subjects: Anthropology

American Arrivals

Anthropology Engages the New Immigration
Edited by Nancy Foner

Soaring immigration to the United States in the past few decades has reawakened both popular and scholarly interest in this important issue. American Arrivals highlights the important insights of anthropology for the field of migration studies.

Gray Areas

Ethnographic Encounters with Nursing Home Culture
Edited by Phillip B. Stafford

This volume features ten scholars from anthropology, nursing, sociology, gerontology, human geography, and other disciplines who provide ethnographic case studies exploring critical care decision-making, models of care for people with Alzheimer’s disease, the way residents cope with the limitations, indignities, and opportunities of nursing home life, the roles of family members and nursing home employees, and the formulation of assisted living.

Subjects: Anthropology

Remaking Life and Death

Toward an Anthropology of the Biosciences
Edited by Sarah FranklinMargaret Lock

The boundaries of life now occupy a place of central concern among biological anthropologists. Because of the centrality of the modern biological definition of life to Euro-American medicine and anthropology, the definition of life itself and its contestation exemplify competing uses of knowledge.

Tikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, and Affairs of State

Advancing Maya Archaeology
Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff

New insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal's rulers.

Catastrophe and Culture

The Anthropology of Disaster
Edited by Susanna M. HoffmanAnthony Oliver-Smith

At a time of increasing globalization and worldwide vulnerability, the study of disasters has become an important focus for anthropological research-one where the four fields of anthropology are synthesized to address the multidimensionality of the effects to a community’s social structures and relationship to the environment.

Subjects: Anthropology

The Empire of Things

Regimes of Value and Material Culture
Edited by Fred R. Myers

Representing a new wave of thinking about material culture studies-a topic long overdue for reevaluation-the essays in this volume take a fresh look at the relationship between material culture and exchange theory and illuminate the changing patterns of cultural flow in an increasingly global economy and the cultural differences registered in “regimes of value.”

Uruk Mesopotamia and Its Neighbors

Cross-cultural Interactions in the Era of State Formation
Edited by Mitchell S. Rothman

In Uruk Mesopotamia and Its Neighbors, ten field and theoretical archaeologists working in the area today offer an overview and analysis of new data and interpretations for Greater Mesopotamia during the late fifth and fourth millennia B.C.

Subjects: Archaeology

Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest

Labor, Power, and Prestige
Edited by Patricia L. Crown

Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige.

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