School for Advanced Research Advanced Seminar Series

Uruk Mesopotamia and Its Neighbors

Cross-cultural Interactions in the Era of State Formation
Edited by Mitchell S. Rothman

In Uruk Mesopotamia and Its Neighbors, ten field and theoretical archaeologists working in the area today offer an overview and analysis of new data and interpretations for Greater Mesopotamia during the late fifth and fourth millennia B.C.

Subjects: Archaeology

Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest

Labor, Power, and Prestige
Edited by Patricia L. Crown

Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige.

History in Person

Enduring Struggles, Contentious Practice, Intimate Identities
Edited by Dorothy HollandJean Lave

Extended conflict situations in Northern Ireland or South Africa, the local effects of the rise of multinational corporations, and conflicts in workplaces, households, and academic fields are all crucibles for the forging of identities. In this volume, the authors bring their research to bear on enduring struggles and the practices of identity within those struggles. This collection of essays explores the innermost, generative aspects of subjects as social, cultural, and historical beings and raises serious questions about long-term conflicts and sustained identities in the world today.

Subjects: Anthropology

Biology, Brains, and Behavior

The Evolution of Human Development
Edited by Sue Taylor ParkerJonas LangerMichael L. McKinney

An exciting new cross-disciplinary field of biocultural research is emerging at the start of the twenty-first century: developmental evolutionary biology.

War in the Tribal Zone

Expanding States and Indigenous Warfare
Edited by R. Brian FergusonNeil L. Whitehead

War in the Tribal Zone, the 1991 anthropology of war classic, is back in print with a new preface by the editors. Their timely and insightful essay examines the occurrence of ethnic conflict and violence in the decade since the idea of the "tribal zone" originally was formulated.

Regimes of Language

Ideologies, Polities, and Identities
Edited by Paul V. Kroskrity

In Regimes of Language, ten leading linguistic anthropologists integrate two often segregated domains: politics (without language) and language (without politics). Their essays contribute to an understanding of the role of language ideologies and discursive practices in state formation, nationalism, and the maintenance of ethnic groups, on the one hand, and in the creation of national, ethnic, and professional identities, on the other.

The Origins of Language

What Nonhuman Primates Can Tell Us
Edited by Barbara J. King

In The Origins of Language, ten primatologists and paleoanthropologists conduct a comprehensive examination of the nonhuman primate data, discussing different views of what language is and suggesting how the primatological perspective can be used to fashion more rigorous theories of language origins and evolution.

Critical Anthropology Now

Unexpected Contexts, Shifting Constituencies, Changing Agendas
Edited by George E. Marcus

Building on the legacy of Writing Culture, Critical Anthropology Now vividly represents the changing nature of anthropological research practice, demonstrating how new and more complicated locations of research-from the boardrooms of multinational corporations to the chat rooms of the Internet-are giving rise to shifts in the character of fieldwork and fieldworker.

Subjects: Anthropology

Archaic States

Edited by Gary M. FeinmanJoyce Marcus

One of the most challenging problems facing contemporary archaeology concerns the operation and diversity of ancient states. This volume addresses how ancient states were structured and how they operated, an understanding of which is key to our ability to interpret a state's rise or fall.

Cyborgs and Citadels

Anthropological Interventions in Emerging Sciences and Technologies
Edited by Gary Lee DowneyJoseph Dumit

Some of the country’s most influential thinkers use anthropological methods and theories to examine the practices and practitioners of contemporary science, technology, and medicine in the United States. The authors explore such questions as how science gains authority to direct truth practices, the boundaries between humans and machines, and how science, technology, and medicine contribute to the fashioning of selves.

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