School for Advanced Research Press

Linking the Histories of Slavery

North America and Its Borderlands
Edited by Bonnie MartinJames F. Brooks

This volume has brought together scholars from anthropology, history, psychology, and ethnic studies to share their original research into the lesser-known stories of slavery in North America and reveal surprising parallels among slave cultures across the continent.

First Coastal Californians

Edited by Lynn H. Gamble

This book chronicles how indigenous peoples of the past survived and thrived in the shifting environment of coastal California.

Subjects: Archaeology

Making Disasters

Climate Change, Neoliberal Governance, and Livelihood Insecurity on the Mongolian Steppe
By Craig R. JanesOyuntsetseg Chuluundorj

The authors analyze a broad range of phenomena that are fundamentally linked to the adverse social and economic consequences of climate change, including urbanization and urban poverty, access to essential health care and education, changes to gender roles (especially for women), rural economic development and resource extraction, and public health more generally.

Subjects: Anthropology

Artisans and Advocacy in the Global Market

Walking the Heart Path
Edited by Jeanne SimonelliKatherine O’DonnellJune Nash

Contributors to this book explore how crafts — pottery, weaving, basketmaking, storytelling — in Middle America and beyond are a means of making an intangible cultural heritage visible, material, and enduring. Each contribution shows how social science research can evolve into advocacy, collaboration, and friendship.

Subjects: Anthropology

Disturbing Bodies

Perspectives on Forensic Anthropology
Edited by Zoë CrosslandRosemary A. Joyce

The theme of “disturbing bodies” has a double valence, evoking both the work that anthropologists do and also the ways in which the dead can, in turn, disturb the living through their material qualities, through dreams and other forms of presence, and through the political claims often articulated around them.

Subjects: Anthropology

Things in Motion

Object Itineraries in Anthropological Practice
Edited by Rosemary A. JoyceSusan D. Gillespie

Complementing the concept of object biography, the contributors to this volume use the complex construct of “itineraries” to trace the places in which objects come to rest or are active, the routes through which things circulate, and the means by which they are moved.

Fixing the Books

Secrecy, Literacy, and Perfectibility in Indigenous New Mexico
By Erin Debenport

In Fixing the Books, professor Erin Debenport (anthropology, University of New Mexico) presents the research she conducted on an indigenous language literacy effort within a New Mexico Pueblo community, and the potential of that literacy to compromise Pueblo secrecy.

Medieval Mississippians

The Cahokian World
Edited by Timothy R. PauketatSusan M. Alt

Medieval Mississippians, the eighth volume in the award-winning Popular Archaeology Series, introduces a key historical period in pre-Columbian eastern North America—the “Mississippian” era—via chapters on places, practices, and peoples written from Native American and non-Native perspectives on the past.

Subjects: Archaeology

Living the Ancient Southwest

Edited by David Grant Noble

How did Southwestern peoples make a living in the vast arid reaches of the Great Basin? When and why did violence erupt in the Mesa Verde region? Who were the Fremont people? How do some Hopis view Chaco Canyon? These are just a few of the topics addressed in Living the Ancient Southwest.

Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability

Edited by Nancy N. ChenLesley A. Sharp

“Biosecurity” has ballooned into an increasingly mundane aspect of human experience, serving as a catchall for the detection, surveillance, containment, and deflection of everything from epidemics and natural disasters to resource scarcities and political insurgencies.

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