School for Advanced Research Press

Our Lives

Collaboration, Native Voice, and the Making of the National Museum of the American Indian
By Jennifer A. Shannon

In 2004 the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) opened to the general public. This book, in the broadest sense, is about how that museum became what it is today. For many Native individuals, the NMAI, a prominent and permanent symbol of Native presence in America, in the shadow of the Capitol and at the center of federal power, is a triumph.

Subjects: American Indians

Indian Subjects

Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education
Edited by Brenda J. ChildBrian Klopotek

Indian Subjects brings together an outstanding group of scholars from the fields of anthropology, history, law, education, literature, and Native studies to address indigenous education throughout different regions and eras.

Katherine Dunham

Recovering an Anthropological Legacy, Choreographing Ethnographic Futures
Edited by Elizabeth Chin

This book explores Katherine Dunham’s contribution to anthropology and the ongoing relevance of her ideas and methodologies, rejecting the idea that art and academics need to be cleanly separated from each other.

Subjects: Anthropology

A Pueblo Social History

Kinship, Sodality, and Community in the Northern Southwest
By John A. Ware

A Pueblo Social History explores the intersection of archaeology, ethnohistory, and ethnology. John Ware argues that all of the key Pueblo social, ceremonial, and political institutions—and their relative importance across the Pueblo world—can only be explained in terms of indigenous social history stretching back nearly two millennia.

(Mis)managing Migration

Guestworkers' Experiences with North American Labor Markets
Edited by David Griffith

Today managed migration is growing in North America. This mirrors the general growth of migration from poorer to richer countries, with more than 200 million people now living outside their natal countries. Faced with this phenomenon, managed migration enables nation-states to regulate those population movements; direct foreign nationals to specific, identified economic sectors that citizens are less likely to care about; match employers who claim labor shortages with highly motivated workers; and offer people from poorer countries higher earning potential abroad through temporary absence from their families and homelands.

Subjects: Anthropology

Cash on the Table

Markets, Values, and Moral Economies
Edited by Edward F. Fischer

A great deal is at stake in understanding the moral dimensions of economic behavior and markets. Public debates over executive compensation, the fair trade movement, and recent academic inquiries into the limitations of rational-choice paradigms all point to the relevance of moral values in our economic decision-making processes. Moral values inform economic behavior.

Indian Policies in the Americas

from Columbus to Collier and Beyond
By William Y. Adams

In Indian Policies in the Americas, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies.

Otros Saberes

Collaborative Research on Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Cultural Politics
Edited by Charles R. HaleLynn Stephen

The six research projects that form the core of the Otros Saberes initiative bring together a diverse group of Afro-descendant and indigenous collaborations with academics. The focus of each research project is driven by a strategic priority in the life of the community, organization, or social movement concerned. This book, written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, provides an explanation of the key analytical questions and findings of each project.

Street Economies in the Urban Global South

Edited by Karen Tranberg HansenWalter E. LittleB. Lynne Milgram

This book focuses on the economic, political, social, and cultural dynamics of street economies across the urban Global South. Although contestations over public space have a long history, Street Economies in the Urban Global South presents the argument that the recent conjuncture of neoliberal economic policies and unprecedented urban growth in the Global South has changed the equation.

Subjects: Anthropology

Anthropology of Race

Genes, Biology, and Culture
Edited by John Hartigan

What do we know about race today? After years of debate and inquiry by anthropologists, the question remains fraught with emotion and the answer remains complicated and uncertain. Anthropology of Race confronts the challenge of formulating an effective rejoinder to new arguments and new data about race, and attempts to address the intense desire to understand race and why it matters.

Subjects: Anthropology

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