School for Advanced Research Press

Dances of the Tewa Pueblo Indians

Expressions of New Life
Second Edition
By Jill D. Sweet

This expanded edition reflects these changes by featuring the voices of Tewa dancers, composers, and others to explain the significance of dance to their understanding of Tewa identity and community. The author frames their words with her own poignant reflections on more than twenty years of study and friendship with these creative and enduring people.

Anthropology in the Margins of the State

Edited by Veena DasDeborah Poole

The very form and reach of the modern state are changing radically under the pressure of globalization. Featuring nine of the leading scholars in the field, this innovative exploration of these transformations develops an ethnographic methodology and theoretical apparatus to assess perceptions of power in three regions where state reform and violence have been particularly dramatic: Africa, Latin America, and South Asia.

Pluralizing Ethnography

Comparison and Representation in Maya Cultures, Histories, and Identities
Edited by John M. WatanabeEdward F. Fischer

This volume brings together eight Maya specialists and a prominent anthropological theorist as discussant to assess the contrasting historical circumstances and emerging cultural futures of Maya in Mexico and Guatemala.

Law and Empire in the Pacific

Fiji and Hawai`i
Edited by Sally Engle MerryDonald Brenneis

Focusing on the intimate relationship between law, culture, and the production of social knowledge, these essays re-center law in social theory. The authors analyze the transition from chiefdom to capitalism, colonizers’ racial and governmental ideologies, land and labor policies, and contemporary efforts to recuperate indigenous culture and assert or maintain indigenous sovereignty. Speaking to Fijian and Hawaiian circumstances, this volume illuminates the role of legal and archival practice in constructing ethnic and political identities and producing colonial and anthropological knowledge.

Subjects: Anthropology

American Arrivals

Anthropology Engages the New Immigration
Edited by Nancy Foner

Soaring immigration to the United States in the past few decades has reawakened both popular and scholarly interest in this important issue. American Arrivals highlights the important insights of anthropology for the field of migration studies.

Gray Areas

Ethnographic Encounters with Nursing Home Culture
Edited by Phillip B. Stafford

This volume features ten scholars from anthropology, nursing, sociology, gerontology, human geography, and other disciplines who provide ethnographic case studies exploring critical care decision-making, models of care for people with Alzheimer’s disease, the way residents cope with the limitations, indignities, and opportunities of nursing home life, the roles of family members and nursing home employees, and the formulation of assisted living.

Subjects: Anthropology

The Flow of Power

Ancient Water Systems and Landscapes
By Vernon L. Scarborough

This book is the first longitudinal study to consider water management worldwide since Karl Wittfogel put forth his “hydraulic societies” hypothesis nearly two generations ago, and it draws together the diverse debates that seminal work inspired. In so doing, Scarborough offers new models for cross-cultural analysis and prepares the ground for new examinations of power, centralization, and the economy.

Subjects: Archaeology

At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds

Meditations on Navajo Landscapes
By Gloria J. Emerson

These poems, paintings, and personal reflections draw upon an ancient culture while crafting new visual and poetic "legends" to enrich our understanding of the significant places and stories that mark the traditional lands of the Navajo people. A book at once intimate, sweeping, and learned, At the Hems of the Lowest Clouds announces an important new Native American artistic voice.

Subjects: American Indians

Remaking Life and Death

Toward an Anthropology of the Biosciences
Edited by Sarah FranklinMargaret Lock

The boundaries of life now occupy a place of central concern among biological anthropologists. Because of the centrality of the modern biological definition of life to Euro-American medicine and anthropology, the definition of life itself and its contestation exemplify competing uses of knowledge.

Tikal: Dynasties, Foreigners, and Affairs of State

Advancing Maya Archaeology
Edited by Jeremy A. Sabloff

New insights from the Tikal excavations and epigraphic breakthroughs suggest that a thriving marketplace existed in the center of the city, that foreigners comprised a significant element of its populace, and that differences in tomb form and contents signal the changing fortunes of Tikal's rulers.

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