School for Advanced Research Press

Ambos Nogales

Intimate Portraits of the U.S.-Mexico Border
By Maeve HickeyLawrence Taylor

Evoking the startling contrasts, brutalities, radiant beauty, and resilient people, these astonishing duotone photographs and penetrating essays reveal the ironic embrace of Nogales. The would-be immigrant caught in the tunnel between Nogales, Sonora, and Nogales, Arizona, knows life is dangerous and surprising.

Subjects: HistorySouthwest

Catastrophe and Culture

The Anthropology of Disaster
Edited by Susanna M. HoffmanAnthony Oliver-Smith

At a time of increasing globalization and worldwide vulnerability, the study of disasters has become an important focus for anthropological research-one where the four fields of anthropology are synthesized to address the multidimensionality of the effects to a community’s social structures and relationship to the environment.

Subjects: Anthropology

Indian Painters of the Southwest

The Deep Remembering
By Katherin L. Chase

The book profiles ten outstanding painters representing seven different Pueblo Indian groups and the Navajo Nation who participated in a convocation at the Indian Arts Research Center at the SAR. While some artists have chosen to depict traditional scenes and symbols and others have chosen to create modern works influenced by Euro-American painting, all draw on the “deep remembering” of tribal heritage and personal experience and a heightened awareness of the artist’s role in more than one modern world.

The Empire of Things

Regimes of Value and Material Culture
Edited by Fred R. Myers

Representing a new wave of thinking about material culture studies-a topic long overdue for reevaluation-the essays in this volume take a fresh look at the relationship between material culture and exchange theory and illuminate the changing patterns of cultural flow in an increasingly global economy and the cultural differences registered in “regimes of value.”

Uruk Mesopotamia and Its Neighbors

Cross-cultural Interactions in the Era of State Formation
Edited by Mitchell S. Rothman

In Uruk Mesopotamia and Its Neighbors, ten field and theoretical archaeologists working in the area today offer an overview and analysis of new data and interpretations for Greater Mesopotamia during the late fifth and fourth millennia B.C.

Subjects: Archaeology

History in Person

Enduring Struggles, Contentious Practice, Intimate Identities
Edited by Dorothy HollandJean Lave

Extended conflict situations in Northern Ireland or South Africa, the local effects of the rise of multinational corporations, and conflicts in workplaces, households, and academic fields are all crucibles for the forging of identities. In this volume, the authors bring their research to bear on enduring struggles and the practices of identity within those struggles. This collection of essays explores the innermost, generative aspects of subjects as social, cultural, and historical beings and raises serious questions about long-term conflicts and sustained identities in the world today.

Subjects: Anthropology

Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest

Labor, Power, and Prestige
Edited by Patricia L. Crown

Women and Men in the Prehispanic Southwest takes a groundbreaking look at gendered activities in prehistory and the differential access that women and men had to sources and symbols of power and prestige.

Biology, Brains, and Behavior

The Evolution of Human Development
Edited by Sue Taylor ParkerJonas LangerMichael L. McKinney

An exciting new cross-disciplinary field of biocultural research is emerging at the start of the twenty-first century: developmental evolutionary biology.

War in the Tribal Zone

Expanding States and Indigenous Warfare
Edited by R. Brian FergusonNeil L. Whitehead

War in the Tribal Zone, the 1991 anthropology of war classic, is back in print with a new preface by the editors. Their timely and insightful essay examines the occurrence of ethnic conflict and violence in the decade since the idea of the "tribal zone" originally was formulated.

Regimes of Language

Ideologies, Polities, and Identities
Edited by Paul V. Kroskrity

In Regimes of Language, ten leading linguistic anthropologists integrate two often segregated domains: politics (without language) and language (without politics). Their essays contribute to an understanding of the role of language ideologies and discursive practices in state formation, nationalism, and the maintenance of ethnic groups, on the one hand, and in the creation of national, ethnic, and professional identities, on the other.

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