School for Advanced Research Press

The Origins of Language

What Nonhuman Primates Can Tell Us
Edited by Barbara J. King

In The Origins of Language, ten primatologists and paleoanthropologists conduct a comprehensive examination of the nonhuman primate data, discussing different views of what language is and suggesting how the primatological perspective can be used to fashion more rigorous theories of language origins and evolution.

Critical Anthropology Now

Unexpected Contexts, Shifting Constituencies, Changing Agendas
Edited by George E. Marcus

Building on the legacy of Writing Culture, Critical Anthropology Now vividly represents the changing nature of anthropological research practice, demonstrating how new and more complicated locations of research-from the boardrooms of multinational corporations to the chat rooms of the Internet-are giving rise to shifts in the character of fieldwork and fieldworker.

Subjects: Anthropology

All That Glitters

The Emergence of Native American Micaceous Art Pottery in Northern New Mexico
By Duane Anderson

All That Glitters, the first comprehensive study of the micaceous pottery tradition in New Mexico, explores the current transition of micaceous pottery from a traditional culinary ware to an exciting contemporary art form. The illustrated catalog of the micaceous pottery collection at SAR's Indian Arts Research Center and a roster of micaceous potters practicing in northern New Mexico today further details the art form.

Archaic States

Edited by Gary M. FeinmanJoyce Marcus

One of the most challenging problems facing contemporary archaeology concerns the operation and diversity of ancient states. This volume addresses how ancient states were structured and how they operated, an understanding of which is key to our ability to interpret a state's rise or fall.

El Delirio

The Santa Fe World of Elizabeth White
By Gregor StarkE. Catherine Rayne

Richly illustrated with many previously unpublished photographs, El Delirio offers an appealing glimpse into a fascinating period of Santa Fe history. It is also a loving portrait of the remarkable, energetic, and strong-willed Elizabeth White, described by a friend as “one of the great women of the Southwest in a very small body.”

Subjects: History

Cyborgs and Citadels

Anthropological Interventions in Emerging Sciences and Technologies
Edited by Gary Lee DowneyJoseph Dumit

Some of the country’s most influential thinkers use anthropological methods and theories to examine the practices and practitioners of contemporary science, technology, and medicine in the United States. The authors explore such questions as how science gains authority to direct truth practices, the boundaries between humans and machines, and how science, technology, and medicine contribute to the fashioning of selves.

Pueblo Indian Painting

Tradition and Modernism in New Mexico, 1900-1930
By J. J. Brody

A new tradition of Pueblo fine art painting arose in the first three decades of the twentieth century, born out of a dynamic encounter between the Pueblo and Euro-American communities in and around Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Cowboys and Cave Dwellers

Basketmaker Archaeology of Utah's Grand Gulch
By Fred M. BlackburnRay A. Williamson

In this book, Fred M. Blackburn and Ray A. Williamson tell the two intertwined stories of the early archaeological expeditions into Grand Gulch and the Wetherill-Grand Gulch Research Project. In the process, they describe what we now know about Basketmaker culture and present a stirring plea for the preservation of our nation's priceless archaeological heritage. Lavishly illustrated with color and black-and-white photographs.

Senses of Place

Edited by Steven FeldKeith H. Basso

The complex relationship of people to places has come under increasing scholarly scrutiny in recent years as acute global conditions of exile, displacement, and inflamed borders-to say nothing of struggles by indigenous peoples and cultural minorities for ancestral homelands, land rights, and retention of sacred places-have brought the political question of place into sharp focus.

Subjects: Anthropology

Last Hunters, First Farmers

New Perspectives on the Prehistoric Transition to Agriculture
Edited by T. Douglas PriceAnne Birgitte Gebauer

In case studies ranging from the Far East to the American Southwest, the authors of Last Hunters-First Farmers provide a global perspective on contemporary research into the origins of agriculture. Downplaying more traditional explanations of the turn to agriculture, such as the influence of marginal environments and population pressures, the authors emphasize instead the importance of the resource-rich areas in which agriculture began, the complex social organizations already in place, the role of sedentism, and, in some locales, the advent of economic intensification and competition.

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