School for Advanced Research Press

Hisat'sinom

Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water
Edited by Christian E. Downum

The national monuments of Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, and Montezuma’s Castle showcase the treasures of the first people who settled and developed farms, towns, and trade routes throughout northern Arizona and beyond. The Hopis call these ancient peoples “Hisat’sinom,” and Spanish explorers named their hard, arid homeland the sierra sin agua, mountains without water. Indeed, much of the region receives less annual precipitation than the quintessential desert city of Tucson. In Hisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold.

Nature, Science, and Religion

Intersections Shaping Society and the Environment
Edited by Catherine M. Tucker

This book is about the complicated and provocative ways nature, science, and religion intersect in real settings where people attempt to live in harmony with the physical environment. The contributors explore how scientific knowledge and spiritual beliefs are engaged to shape natural resource management, environmental activism, and political processes.

The Shape of Script

How and Why Writing Systems Change
Edited by Stephen D. Houston

This book builds on earlier projects about the origins and extinctions of script traditions throughout the world in an effort to address the fundamental questions of how and why writing systems change. The contributors—who study ancient scripts from Arabic to Roman, from Bronze Age China to Middle Kingdom Egypt—utilize an approach that views writing less as a technology than as a mode of communication, one that is socially learned and culturally transmitted.

Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death

Contemporary Approaches to Bioarchaeology
Edited by Aubrey BaadsgaardAlexis T. BoutinJane E. Buikstra

Taking cues from current theoretical perspectives and capitalizing on the strengths of new and sophisticated methods of analysis, Breathing New Life into the Evidence of Death showcases the vibrancy of bioarchaeological research and its potential for bringing “new life” to the field of mortuary archaeology and the study of human remains.

Dangerous Liaisons

Anthropologists and the National Security State
Edited by Laura A. McNamaraRobert A. Rubinstein

Dangerous Liaisons is a book about intersections. It is a product of two year’s worth of discussion among a group of ethnographers from four different countries studying war, violence, the military, and the state.

Subjects: Anthropology

Imprisoned Art, Complex Patronage

Plains Drawings by Howling Wolf and Zotom at the Autry National Center
By Joyce M. Szabo

The study of what has become known as Plains Indian ledger art and of Fort Marion drawings in particular, has burgeoned in the last forty years. Joyce Szabo’s examination of the two drawing books by Zotom and Howling Wolf encompasses their origins and the issues surrounding their commission as well as what the images say about their creators and their collector.

Remapping Bolivia

Resources, Territory, and Indigeneity in a Plurinational State
Edited by Nicole FabricantBret Gustafson

The 2005 election of Evo Morales to the presidency of Bolivia marked a critical moment of transformation—a coca farmer and peasant union leader became the first indigenous president in the history of the Americas.

Becoming Indian

The Struggle over Cherokee Identity in the Twenty-first Century
By Circe Sturm

In Becoming Indian, author Circe Sturm examines Cherokee identity politics and the phenomenon of racial shifting. Racial shifters, as described by Sturm, are people who have changed their racial self-identification from non-Indian to Indian on the US Census.

Enduring Conquests

Rethinking the Archaeology of Resistance to Spanish Colonialism in the Americas
Edited by Matthew LiebmannMelissa S. Murphy

Enduring Conquests presents new interpretations of Native American experiences under Spanish colonialism and challenges the reader to reexamine long-standing assumptions about the Spanish conquests of the Americas.

Forces of Compassion

Humanitarianism between Ethics and Politics
Edited by Erica BornsteinPeter Redfield

Suffering and charity have a long history. Both human sorrows and attempted remedies were familiar features of life in earlier eras and religious traditions, however, during the final decades of the twentieth century, natural disasters and civilian casualties of war transformed into “humanitarian crises.” In these recurring dramas presented by international media, an extensive network of interstate entities and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) supplies assistance to victims.

Subjects: Anthropology

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