School for Advanced Research Press

Opening Archaeology

Repatriation's Impact on Contemporary Research and Practice
Edited by Thomas W. Killion

In 1989–90, Congress enacted two laws, the National Museum of the American Indian Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, that required museums and other repositories of Native American human remains and cultural items to consult with, share information about, and return some items to federally recognized Indian tribes and Native Alaskan and Hawaiian communities.

New Landscapes of Inequality

Neoliberalism and the Erosion of Democracy in America
Edited by Jane L. CollinsMicaela di LeonardoBrett Williams

Focusing on the United States, the contributors to this volume analyze how the globalization of newly untrammeled capitalism has exacerbated preexisting inequalities, how the retreat of the benevolent state and the rise of the punitive, imperial state are related, how poorly privatized welfare institutions provide services, how neoliberal and neoconservative ideologies are melding, and how recurrent moral panics misrepresent class, race, gendered, and sexual realities on the ground.

The Chaco Experience

Landscape and Ideology at the Center Place
By Ruth M. Van Dyke

In a remote canyon in northwest New Mexico, thousand-year-old sandstone walls waver in the sunlight, stretching like ancient vertebrae against a turquoise sky. This storied place—Chaco Canyon—carries multiple layers of meaning for Native Americans and archaeologists, writers and tourists, explorers and artists.

Kenneth Chapman's Santa Fe

Artists and Archaeologists, 1907-1931: The Memoirs of Kenneth Chapman
Edited by Marit K. Munson

Archaeologist and rock art specialist Marit K. Munson presents a carefully edited and annotated edition of Chapman’s memoirs. Written in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Chapman’s side of the story is an intimate insider's portrait of the personalities and events that shaped Santa Fe.

The Gender of Globalization

Women Navigating Cultural and Economic Marginalities
Edited by Nandini GunewardenaAnn Kingsolver

As “globalization” moves rapidly from buzzword to cliché, evaluating the claims of neoliberal capitalism to empower and enrich remains urgently important. The authors in this volume employ feminist, ethnographic methods to examine what free trade and export processing zones, economic liberalization, and currency reform mean to women in Argentina, Sri Lanka, Mexico, Ghana, the United States, India, Jamaica, and many other places.

The Hohokam Millennium

Edited by Suzanne K. FishPaul R. Fish

The mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and platform mounds they built, and much more.

Subjects: Archaeology

Beyond Red Power

American Indian Politics and Activism since 1900
Edited by Daniel M. CobbLoretta Fowler

How do we explain not just the survival of Indian people in the United States against very long odds but their growing visibility and political power at the opening of the twenty-first century?

Imperial Formations

Edited by Ann Laura StolerCarole McGranahanPeter C. Perdue

The contributors to this volume critique and abandon the limiting assumption that the European colonialism of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries can be taken as the representative form of imperialism. Recasting the study of imperial governance, forms of sovereignty, and the imperial state, the authors pay close attention to non-European empires and the active trade in ideas, practices, and technologies among empires, as well as between metropolitan regions and far-flung colonies.

Talking With the Clay

The Art of Pueblo Pottery in the 21st Century
20th Anniversary Revised Edition
By Stephen Trimble

When you hold a Pueblo pot in your hands, you feel a tactile connection through the clay to the potter and to centuries of tradition. You will find no better guide to this feeling than Talking with the Clay.

A Peculiar Alchemy

A Centennial History of SAR, 1907-2007
By Nancy Owen LewisKay Leigh Hagan

In 2007, SAR celebrated its 100th anniversary. Established to promote the study of American antiquity, the School now supports wide-ranging programs dedicated to increasing our understanding of human culture and evolution through the arts, humanities, and social sciences.

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