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48 halftones, 56 maps, 3 charts

Following the Royal Road

A Guide to the Historic Camino Real de Tierra Adentro
By Hal Jackson

Details

Overview

The Camino Real de Tierra Adentro (Royal Road of the Interior Land) is North America's oldest and longest road. Juan de Oñate extended the Camino to New Mexico in 1598, making it 1,500 miles long. Here, Hal Jackson brings to life this important route connecting Mexico City with Santa Fe, New Mexico. It was the lifeline for administrative, commercial, and ecclesiastical functions in northern Mexico.

The northern section of the Camino Real, the portion in New Mexico and Texas, was designated a National Historic Trail by the U.S. Congress in 2000, and an interpretive and visitor center (El Camino Real Historic Trail Site) opened in 2005 south of Socorro, New Mexico. This guidebook provides the traveler with useful commentary on the entire Camino as it winds its way from New Mexico through Mexico, ending in Mexico City.

Jackson includes narrative accounts collected from a variety of primary sources to add an eyewitness perspective to topics as diverse as sixteenth-century haciendas, colonial presidios, and important rest stops (parajes) on the Camino in New Mexico. There are many historical vignettes plus sixty maps drawn by the author to assist in finding Camino sites. Other information provides the traveler with details such as highway numbers, mileage, accommodations, and areas of interest off the main Camino route.

Contributor Bios
Hal Jackson is professor emeritus of geography at Humboldt State University and is currently part of the adjunct faculty of University of New Mexico's geography department. He resides in Placitas, New Mexico.
Marc Simmons is considered New Mexico's historian laureate and has published over forty books on New Mexico history. Simmons is a former Woodrow Wilson Fellow, a recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship, and in 1993 the King of Spain granted him membership in the knightly Order of Isabela la Catílica for his contributions to Spanish colonial history. He resides in Cerrillos, New Mexico.