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Imagining Histories of Colonial Latin America

Synoptic Methods and Practices
Edited by Karen MelvinSylvia Sellers-García

Details

Overview

Winner of the 2018 D. Scott Palmer Best Edited Volume Prize from the New England Council of Latin American Studies

Imagining Histories of Colonial Latin America
teaches imaginative and distinctive approaches to the practice of history through a series of essays on colonial Latin America. It demonstrates ways of making sense of the past through approaches that aggregate more than they dissect and suggest more than they conclude. Sidestepping more conventional approaches that divide content by subject, source, or historiographical “turn,” the editors seek to take readers beyond these divisions and deep into the process of historical interpretation. The essays in this volume focus on what questions to ask, what sources can reveal, what stories historians can tell, and how a single source can be interpreted in many ways.

Contributor Bios
Karen Melvin is a professor of history and a member of the Latin American Studies Program at Bates College. She is the author of Building Colonial Cities of God: Mendicant Orders and Urban Culture in New Spain and a series of essays on global Catholicism.
Sylvia Sellers-García is an associate professor of history at Boston College. She is the author of Distance and Documents at the Spanish Empire’s Periphery. Her current research focuses on social violence in the eighteenth century. Along with Melvin, she is a principal investigator and cofounder of Reading the Inquisition, an online collection of transcribed and translated Inquisition cases.