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The Postclassic to Spanish-Era Transition in Mesoamerica

Archaeological Perspectives
Edited by Susan KepecsRani T. Alexander

Details

Overview

In this volume, thirteen anthropological archaeologists working in historical time frames in Mesoamerica, including editors Susan Kepecs and Rani Alexander, break down the artificial barrier between archaeology and history by offering new material evidence of the transition from native-ruled, prehispanic society to the age of Spanish administration. Taken together, the chapters contained herein cover most of the key Mesoamerican regions that eventually came under Spanish control.

The authors bring new empirical information to bear on the problem of how prehispanic social, political, and economic organization were transformed, as independent Maya kingdoms, the Aztec empire (with its client states), the Tarascans, and other more distant polities once linked through the macroregional economic web of the Postclassic period were forcibly incorporated into Spain's transatlantic domain. The complex processes of multidirectional interaction and culture contact among Mesoamericans and Europeans are colored by cultural diversity, culture clash, and varied responses ranging from accommodation to resistance to active rebellion. These case studies also illuminate how native organization altered the Spanish imperial process. Ultimately, this volume provides a link between past and present, since Mesoamerican peoples continue to negotiate the effects of globalization on their societies.

Susan Kepecs is an honorary fellow in the department of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Rani T. Alexander is an associate professor in the department of sociology and anthropology at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces.

Contributors:

Thomas H. Charlton is professor of anthropology, University of Iowa, Iowa City.
Susan Toby Evans is professor of anthropology, Pennsylvania State University.
Patricia Fournier García is professor of anthropology, Escuela Nacional de;;Antropología e Historia, México, D.F.
Janine Gasco is associate professor of anthropology, California State University-Dominguez Hills.
Mark T. Lycett is research associate of anthropology, University of Chicago.
Cynthia L. Otis Charlton is an independent scholar, Wellman, Iowa.
Joel W. Palka is associate professor of anthropology, Latin American and Latino Studies, University of Illinois-Chicago.
Helen Perlstein Pollard is professor of anthropology, Michigan State University.
Don S. Rice is professor of anthropology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.
Prudence M. Rice is professor of anthropology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale.
Enrique Rodríguez-Alegría is assistant professor of anthropology, University of Texas-Austin.

Contributor Bios
Susan Kepecs is an honorary fellow in the department of anthropology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.
Matthew Restall is Edwin Erle Sparks Professor of History and Director of Latin American Studies at Pennsylvania State University. Restall is also the author of Invading Guatemala: Spanish, Nahua, and Maya Accounts of the Conquest Wars (coauthor), Seven Myths of the Spanish Conquest, The Maya World, and The Black Middle: Africans, Mayas, and Spaniards in Colonial Yucatán.
Rani T. Alexander is an associate professor in the department of sociology and anthropology at New Mexico State University, Las Cruces.