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20 figs., 6 maps, 19 tables

Puebloan Societies

Homology and Heterogeneity in Time and Space
Edited by Peter M. Whiteley

Details

Overview

Puebloan sociocultural formations of the past and present are the subject of the essays collected here. The contributors draw upon the insights of archaeology, ethnology, and linguistic anthropology to examine social history and practice, including kinship groups, ritual sodalities, architectural forms, economic exchange, environmental adaptation, and political order, as well as their patterns of transmission over time and space. The result is a window onto how major Puebloan societies came to be and how they have changed over time.

As an interdisciplinary conjunction, Puebloan Societies demonstrates the value of reengagement among anthropological subfields too often isolated from one another. The volume is an analytical whole greater than the sum of its parts: a new synthesis in this fascinating region of human cultural history.

Contributor Bios
Peter M. Whiteley is the curator of North American ethnology at the American Museum of Natural History. His research on Hopi social organization has resulted in multiple publications. He has also conducted ethnographic and ethnohistoric research and written on several other Pueblo social histories, notably Laguna, Isleta, Kewa, and Tesuque.