Archaeology

Easter Island's Silent Sentinels

The Sculpture and Architecture of Rapa Nui
By Kenneth TreisterPatricia Vargas CasanovaClaudio Cristino

This richly illustrated book of the history, culture, and art of Easter Island is the first to examine in detail the island’s vernacular architecture, often overshadowed by its giant stone statues.

Inka Human Sacrifice and Mountain Worship

Strategies for Empire Unification
By Thomas Besom

In this study, Besom explores the ritual practices of human sacrifice and the worship of mountains, attested in both archaeological investigations and ethnohistorical sources, as tools in the establishment and preservation of political power within the Inka empire.

An Archaeology of Doings

Secularism and the Study of Pueblo Religion
By Severin M. Fowles

In this probing study, Severin Fowles undertakes a sustained critique of religion as an analytical category in archaeological research.

Big Histories, Human Lives

Tackling Problems of Scale in Archaeology
Edited by John RobbTimothy R. Pauketat

The contributors consider something archaeologists seldom think about: the intersection of micro-scale human experience with large-scale and long-term histories.

Subjects: Archaeology

Rock Art Images of Northern New Mexico

By Dennis Slifer

This guide draws on Dennis Slifer’s thirty years of Southwest rock art exploration to explain the significance of rock art in areas of New Mexico.

The Futures of Our Pasts

Ethical Implications of Collecting Antiquities in the Twenty-first Century
Edited by Michael A. AdlerSusan Benton Bruning

Ownership of “the past”—a concept invoking age-old struggles to possess and control ancient objects—is an essential theme in understanding our global cultural heritage. Beyond ownership, however, lies the need for stewardship: the responsibility of owners, possessors, and others interested in ancient objects to serve as custodians for the benefit of present and future generations.

Subjects: Archaeology

The Road to Ruins

By Ian Graham

Graham eloquently describes his well-lived life as a traveler, photographer, and Mayanist.

Hisat'sinom

Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water
Edited by Christian E. Downum

The national monuments of Wupatki, Walnut Canyon, and Montezuma’s Castle showcase the treasures of the first people who settled and developed farms, towns, and trade routes throughout northern Arizona and beyond. The Hopis call these ancient peoples “Hisat’sinom,” and Spanish explorers named their hard, arid homeland the sierra sin agua, mountains without water. Indeed, much of the region receives less annual precipitation than the quintessential desert city of Tucson. In Hisat’sinom: Ancient Peoples in a Land without Water, archaeologists explain how the people of this region flourished despite living in a place with very little water and extremes of heat and cold.

Children of Time

Evolution and the Human Story
By Anne H. Weaver
Illustrations by Matt Celeskey

Children of Time brings the evolution of human behavior to life through Anne Weaver's scientifically-informed imagination.

El Mirón Cave, Cantabrian Spain

The Site and Its Holocene Archaeological Record
Edited by Lawrence Guy StrausManuel R. Gonzáles Morales

Archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians will be drawn to this study of El Mirón Cave and its extensive findings, dated by some seventy-five radiocarbon assays.

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