Archaeology

The Archaeologist was a Spy

Sylvanus G. Morley and the Office of Naval Intelligence
By Louis R. SadlerCharles H. Harris

Sylvanus G. Morley was the most influential Mayan archaeologist of his generation and perhaps the greatest American spy of WWI. Harris and Sadler document for the first time Morley's dual career as a scholar and a spy. Working for the Office of Naval Intelligence, he proved an invaluable source of information about German and anti-American activity in Mexico and Central America.

The Ancient Southwest

Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde
Revised Edition
By David E. Stuart

Stuart's accessible stories of the ancient peoples and sites of the American Southwest have been updated with recent discoveries on Chaco Canyon, Bandelier, and Mesa Verde.

Fire

The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution
By Frances D. Burton

Fire and light, and their impacts on our earliest human ancestor, are the subjects of this innovative study of the development of the species.

Life on the Rocks

One Woman's Adventures in Petroglyph Preservation
By Katherine Wells

Artist Katherine Wells's life story starts with an early interest in Native art and the petroglyphs of the Southwest that drew her to New Mexico and led to a major effort to preserve the iconic images she found on her own land.

Conquest and Catastrophe

Changing Rio Grande Pueblo Settlement Patterns in the Sixteenth and Seventeenth Centuries
By Elinore M. Barrett

Conquest and Catastrophe is a multifaceted reinterpretation of the Pueblo losses of settlements and population from 1540 until after reconquest at the end of the 1600s.

Yucatan Through Her Eyes

Alice Dixon Le Plongeon, Writer and Expeditionary Photographer
By Lawrence Desmond

The biography and photographs of this talented and adventurous woman are accompanied here by her previously unpublished diary.

The Monuments of Piedras Negras, an Ancient Maya City

By Flora Simmons Clancy

The stunning imagery created at Piedras Negras was produced for cultural and ceremonial purposes, but Maya expert Clancy argues that its enduring artistic value cannot be ignored.

Moche Art and Visual Culture in Ancient Peru

By Margaret Jackson

This multidisciplinary study analyzes the visual, linguistic, and cultural significance of the imagery used by the Moche in their ceramics and murals.

The Great Basin

People and Place in Ancient Times
Edited by Catherine S. FowlerDon D. Fowler

This book is about a place, the Great Basin of western North America, and about the lifeways of Native American people who lived there during the past 13,000 years. The authors highlight the ingenious solutions people devised to sustain themselves in a difficult environment.

The Ancient City

New Perspectives on Urbanism in the Old and New World
Edited by Joyce MarcusJeremy A. Sabloff

Cities are so common today that we cannot imagine a world without them. More than half of the world's population lives in cities, and that proportion is growing. Yet for most of our history, there were no cities. Why, how, and when did urban life begin?

Subjects: Archaeology

Pages