Archaeology

Kenneth Milton Chapman

A Life Dedicated to Indian Arts and Artists
By Janet ChapmanKaren Barrie

The many contributions of this early expert on Pueblo Indian anthropology and art are highlighted by two of his descendants.

Memory Work

Archaeologies of Material Practices
Edited by Barbara J. MillsWilliam H. Walker

Memory making is a social practice that links people and things together across time and space and ultimately has material consequences. The intersection of matter and social practice becomes archaeologically visible through the deposits created during social activities. The contributors to this volume share a common goal to map out the different ways in which to study social memories in past societies programmatically and tangibly.

Subjects: Archaeology

Santa Fe

History of an Ancient City
Revised and Expanded Edition
Edited by David Grant Noble

In 2010, Santa Fe officially turned 400—four centuries of a rich and contentious history of Indian, Spanish, and American interactions.

Digging for Dollars

American Archaeology and the New Deal
By Paul Fagette

Fagette's book is a thorough, compelling history of American archaeology in its most critical decade, the 1930s.

Small Worlds

Method, Meaning, and Narrative in Microhistory
Edited by James F. BrooksChristopher R. N. DeCorseJohn Walton

Growing unease with grand theories of modernization and global integration brought twelve scholars from four disciplines to the School for Advanced Research for an experiment with the research genre known as microhistory. These authors now call for a return to narrative, detailed analysis on a small scale, and the search for unforeseen meanings embedded in cases.

Canyon Gardens

The Ancient Pueblo Landscapes of the American Southwest
Edited by V. B. PriceBaker H. Morrow

Canyon Gardens presents a new look at Puebloan landscaping techniques and uses of plants and how they can influence modern architects in the Southwest.

Opening Archaeology

Repatriation's Impact on Contemporary Research and Practice
Edited by Thomas W. Killion

In 1989–90, Congress enacted two laws, the National Museum of the American Indian Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, that required museums and other repositories of Native American human remains and cultural items to consult with, share information about, and return some items to federally recognized Indian tribes and Native Alaskan and Hawaiian communities.

Pottery and Practice

The Expression of Identity at Pottery Mound and Hummingbird Pueblo
By Suzanne Eckert

Eckert illustrates how the relationship between ethnicity, migration, and ritual practice combined to create a complexly patterned material culture among residents of two fourteenth-century Pueblo villages.

The Chaco Experience

Landscape and Ideology at the Center Place
By Ruth M. Van Dyke

In a remote canyon in northwest New Mexico, thousand-year-old sandstone walls waver in the sunlight, stretching like ancient vertebrae against a turquoise sky. This storied place—Chaco Canyon—carries multiple layers of meaning for Native Americans and archaeologists, writers and tourists, explorers and artists.

The Hohokam Millennium

Edited by Suzanne K. FishPaul R. Fish

The mystery and the beauty of Hohokam civilization are the subjects of the essays in this volume. Written by archaeologists who have led the effort to excavate, record, and preserve the remnants of this ancient culture, the chapters illuminate the way the Hohokam organized their households and their communities, their sophisticated pottery and textiles, their irrigation system, the huge ballcourts and platform mounds they built, and much more.

Subjects: Archaeology

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