Geology

Reining in the Rio Grande

People, Land, and Water
By Fred M. PhillipsG. Emlen HallMary E. Black

This study examines human interactions with the Rio Grande from prehistoric time to the present day and explores what possibilities remain for the desert river.

Valles Caldera

A Geologic History
By Fraser Goff

Formed by massive volcanic eruptions over a million years ago, the Valles Caldera offers scientists unprecedented opportunities for studying its geologic wonders, and now as a national preserve, it offers the public a unique outdoor experience.

The Paleontology of New Mexico

By Barry S. Kues

This comprehensive survey of the fossil record of New Mexico catalogs the plants and animals of the area for the past 500 million years from Precambrian time through the Pleistocene Era.

Under Sacred Ground

A History of Navajo Oil, 1922-1982
By Kathleen P. Chamberlain

Modern Navajo tribal government originated in 1923 solely to approve oil leases. This ethnohistory tracks the major changes brought to the Navajo people in the six decades following the discovery and exploitation of oil and gas on tribal lands.

The Colorado Plateau

A Geologic History
Revised and Updated edition
By Donald L. Baars

Written with the general reader in mind, this is the updated edition of the classic on the geology of the red rock and canyon country of the Fours Corners region of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico.

John Muir

Life and Work
Edited by Sally Miller

Moving beyond the preservationist/utilitarian dichotomy, these essays reveal the complexity of Muir's contribution, stressing the anthropomorphic, aesthetic, and recreational bases of his values. The insights of the historians, literary critics, philosophers, and scientists presented here provide readers with a greater appreciation for Muir's multidimensional personality and his contributions to the preservation movement.

An Unsettled Country

Changing Landscapes of the American West
By Donald Worster

In these four essays, which were presented as the 1992 Calvin P. Horn Lectures in Western History and Culture, Donald Worster incisively discusses the role of the natural environment in the making of the West--and often in its unmaking and remaking.