Western History

Global West, American Frontier

Travel, Empire, and Exceptionalism from Manifest Destiny to the Great Depression
By David M. Wrobel

Looking at both European and American travelers’ accounts of the West, from de Tocqueville’s Democracy in America to William Least Heat-Moon’s Blue Highways, David Wrobel offers a counternarrative to the nation’s romantic entanglement with its western past and suggests the importance of some long-overlooked authors, lively and perceptive witnesses to our history who deserve new attention.

Broken Promises

La Frontera Publishing Presents the American West, More Great Short Stories from America’s Newest Western Writers

La Frontera Publishing presents Broken Promises, its latest collection of thirteen fictional short stories and one novella about the Wild West from America’s newest Western writers, authors who may become tomorrow’s legends of Western literature.

Imagining Geronimo

An Apache Icon in Popular Culture
By William M. Clements

Clements’s study examines Americans’ changing sense of Geronimo and looks at the ways Geronimo tried to maintain control of his own image during more than twenty years in which he was a prisoner of war.

Frontier Cavalry Trooper

The Letters of Private Eddie Matthews, 1869–1874
Edited by Douglas C. McChristian

Private William Edward Matthews letters, published here for the first time, provide an unparalleled chronicle of one soldier’s experiences in the garrison and in the field in the post–Civil War Southwest.

In the Shadow of Billy the Kid

Susan McSween and the Lincoln County War
By Kathleen P. Chamberlain

The Lincoln County War catapulted Susan McSween and a young cowboy named Henry McCarty, alias Billy the Kid, into the history books. As a woman in a man’s story, Susan McSween has been all but ignored. This is the first book to place her in a larger context.

Claims and Speculations

Mining and Writing in the Gilded Age
By Janet Floyd

This study of a broad range of responses to gold and silver mining in the late nineteenth century sets the literary writings of figures such as Mark Twain, Mary Hallock Foote, Bret Harte, and Jack London within the context of writing and representation produced by people involved in the industry: miners and journalists, as well as writers of folklore and song.

Frontier Naturalist

Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas
By Russell M. Lawson

In 1826, Jean Louis Berlandier, a French naturalist, was part of a team sent to explore what is now northern Mexico and the Gulf Coast of Texas. Here, historian Russell Lawson tells the story of this multinational expedition, using Berlandier's copious records as a way of conveying his view of the natural environment.

Conflict in Colonial Sonora

Indians, Priests, and Settlers
By David Yetman

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries northwestern Mexico was the scene of ongoing conflict among three distinct social groups—Indians, religious orders of priests, and settlers. In this study, Yetman examines seven separate instances of such conflict, each of which reveals a different perspective on this complicated world.

Gila

The Life and Death of an American River
Updated and Expanded Edition
By Gregory McNamee

This richly documented cautionary tale narrates the Gila River’s natural and human history. Now updated, McNamee’s study traces recent efforts to resuscitate portions of this important riparian corridor.

Thinking Like a Watershed

Voices from the West
Edited by Jack LoefflerCelestia Loeffler

Thinking Like a Watershed points our understanding of our relationship to the land in new directions. It is shaped by the bioregional visions of the great explorer John Wesley Powell, who articulated the notion that the arid American West should be seen as a mosaic of watersheds, and the pioneering ecologist Aldo Leopold, who put forward the concept of bringing conscience to bear within the realm of “the land ethic.”

Pages