History

Indian Policies in the Americas

from Columbus to Collier and Beyond
By William Y. Adams

In Indian Policies in the Americas, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies.

Philmont

A History of New Mexico's Cimarron Country
By Lawrence R. Murphy

This classic account is the first and still the best comprehensive history of the Colfax County area of northeastern New Mexico.

Subjects: HistorySouthwest

Cables, Crises, and the Press

The Geopolitics of the New International Information System in the Americas, 1866-1903
By John A. Britton

In recent decades the Internet has played what may seem to be a unique role in international crises. This book reveals an interesting parallel in the late nineteenth century, when a new communications system based on advances in submarine cable technology and newspaper printing brought information to an excitable mass audience.

Beyond the Eagle's Shadow

New Histories of Latin America's Cold War
Edited by Virginia Garrard-BurnettMark Atwood LawrenceJulio E. Moreno

The core strategy of these essays is to explore the degree to which Latin Americans either used the Cold War to advance their own interests or were themselves drawn to Cold War polarizations in order to make sense of trends within their part of the world.

Violent Delights, Violent Ends

Sex, Race, and Honor in Colonial Cartagena de Indias
By Nicole von Germeten

This study of sexuality in seventeenth-century Latin America takes the reader beneath the surface of daily life in a colonial city.

No Settlement, No Conquest

A History of the Coronado Entrada
By Richard Flint

Flint takes a new look at the Coronado entrada of 1539-42 that marked the earliest large-scale contact between Europeans and Native Americans in what is now the American Southwest.

The Grandchildren of Solano López

Frontier and Nation in Paraguay, 1904–1936
By Bridget María Chesterton

Bridget María Chesterton’s in-depth examination of Paraguay’s unique nationalism and the role of the frontier in its formation places the debate over López in the context of larger themes of Latin American history, including racial and ethnic identity, authoritarian regimes, and militarism.

Oy, My Buenos Aires

Jewish Immigrants and the Creation of Argentine National Identity
By Mollie Lewis Nouwen

Between 1905 and 1930, more than one hundred thousand Jews left Central and Eastern Europe to settle permanently in Argentina. This book explores how these Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi immigrants helped to create a new urban strain of the Argentine national identity.

For God and Revolution

Priest, Peasant, and Agrarian Socialism in the Mexican Huasteca
By Mark Saad Saka

During the early 1880s, a wave of peasant unrest swept the mountainous Huasteca region of northeastern Mexico. This account traces the material and ideological roots of the rebellion to nineteenth-century liberal policies of land privatization and to the growth of a radical anarcho-communist agrarian consciousness.

Knowing History in Mexico

An Ethnography of Citizenship
By Trevor Stack

While much has been written about national history and citizenship, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, Stack pinpoints what it is that makes people who know history seem like better citizens.

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