History

Coronado on the Turquoise Trail

Knight of Pueblos and Plains
By Herbert E. Bolton

Herbert E. Bolton’s classic of southwestern history, first published in 1949, delivers the epic account of Francisco Vásquez de Coronado’s sixteenth-century entrada to the North American frontier of the Spanish Empire.

Subjects: HistorySouthwest

Four Square Leagues

Pueblo Indian Land in New Mexico
By Malcolm EbrightRick HendricksRichard W. Hughes

This long-awaited book is the most detailed and up-to-date account of the complex history of Pueblo Indian land in New Mexico, beginning in the late seventeenth century and continuing to the present day.

Rider of the Pale Horse

A Memoir of Los Alamos and Beyond
By McAllister Hull
Illustrations by John Hull

A recollection of life in the workshops where nuclear bomb components were constructed during the Manhattan Project.

Searching for Madre Matiana

Prophecy and Popular Culture in Modern Mexico
By Edward Wright-Rios

Edward Wright-Rios examines the much-maligned—and sometimes celebrated—character of Madre Matiana and her position in the development of Mexico.

Women Drug Traffickers

Mules, Bosses, and Organized Crime
By Elaine Carey

“The first full-length study of female drug traffickers. The lives of these women are fascinating and skillfully analyzed by the author. The book will be pleasurable reading to general readers and specialists alike.”—Howard Campbell, author of Drug War Zone: Frontline Dispatches from the Streets of El Paso and Juárez

Africans into Creoles

Slavery, Ethnicity, and Identity in Colonial Costa Rica
By Russell Lohse

Unlike most books on slavery in the Americas, this social history of Africans and their enslaved descendants in colonial Costa Rica recounts the journey of specific people from West Africa to the New World.

Creating Mexican Consumer Culture in the Age of Porfirio Díaz

By Steven B. Bunker

Steven Bunker’s study shows how goods and consumption embodied modernity in the time of Porfirio Díaz, how they provided proof to Mexicans that “incredible things are happening in this world.”

New Mexico's Spanish Livestock Heritage

Four Centuries of Animals, Land, and People
By William W. Dunmire

The Spanish introduced European livestock to the New World—not only cattle and horses but also mules, donkeys, sheep, goats, pigs, and poultry. This survey of the history of domestic livestock in New Mexico is the first of its kind, going beyond cowboy culture to examine the ways Spaniards, Indians, and Anglos used animals and how those uses affected the region’s landscapes and cultures.

Jesuit Student Groups, the Universidad Iberoamericana, and Political Resistance in Mexico, 1913-1979

By David Espinosa

This book focuses on the twentieth-century efforts of the Roman Catholic Church to influence Mexican society through Jesuit-led student organizations designed to promote conservative Catholic values. The author shows that they left a very different imprint on Mexican society, training a generation of activists.

Indian Subjects

Hemispheric Perspectives on the History of Indigenous Education
Edited by Brenda J. ChildBrian Klopotek

Indian Subjects brings together an outstanding group of scholars from the fields of anthropology, history, law, education, literature, and Native studies to address indigenous education throughout different regions and eras.

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