Latin America

For God and Revolution

Priest, Peasant, and Agrarian Socialism in the Mexican Huasteca
By Mark Saad Saka

During the early 1880s, a wave of peasant unrest swept the mountainous Huasteca region of northeastern Mexico. This account traces the material and ideological roots of the rebellion to nineteenth-century liberal policies of land privatization and to the growth of a radical anarcho-communist agrarian consciousness.

Knowing History in Mexico

An Ethnography of Citizenship
By Trevor Stack

While much has been written about national history and citizenship, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, Stack pinpoints what it is that makes people who know history seem like better citizens.

The Course of Andean History

By Peter V. N. Henderson

The only comprehensive history of Andean South America from initial settlement to the present, this useful book focuses on Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia, the four countries where the Andes have played a major role in shaping history.

Indigenous Religion and Cultural Performance in the New Maya World

By Garrett W. CookThomas A. Offit

Based on more than thirty years of ethnographic fieldwork in Highland Guatemala, this study of Maya diviners, shamans, ritual dancers, and religious brotherhoods describes the radical changes in traditional Maya religious practice wrought by economic globalization and political turmoil.

Inka Human Sacrifice and Mountain Worship

Strategies for Empire Unification
By Thomas Besom

In this study, Besom explores the ritual practices of human sacrifice and the worship of mountains, attested in both archaeological investigations and ethnohistorical sources, as tools in the establishment and preservation of political power within the Inka empire.

No Mere Shadows

Faces of Widowhood in Early Colonial Mexico
By Shirley Cushing Flint

Three generations of women in one family are the characters in this intimate historical study of what it meant to be a widow in sixteenth-century Mexico City.

Wellness Beyond Words

Maya Compositions of Speech and Silence in Medical Care
By T. S. Harvey

Responding to the need for in-depth ethnographic studies in cultural and communicative competence, this anthropological account of Maya language use in health care in highland Guatemala explores some of the cultural and linguistic factors that can complicate communication in the practice of medicine.

Like a Bride and Like a Mother

By Rosa Nissán
Translated by Dick Gerdes

Two powerful autobiographical novels of being a Jewish woman in Mexico, dealing with her parents' dictates, and her husband's and family's expectations. The only constant in her life is a need to find her own way.

Calunga and the Legacy of an African Language in Brazil

By Steven Byrd

Steven Byrd’s study provides a comprehensive linguistic description of Calunga based on two years of interviews with speakers of the language. He examines its history and historical context as well as its linguistic context, its sociolinguistic profile, and its lexical and grammatical outlines.

The Roots of Conservatism in Mexico

Catholicism, Society, and Politics in the Mixteca Baja, 1750-1962
By Benjamin T. Smith

The Roots of Conservatism is the first attempt to ask why over the past two centuries so many Mexican peasants have opted to ally with conservative groups rather than their radical counterparts.

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