Latin America

Inka Human Sacrifice and Mountain Worship

Strategies for Empire Unification
By Thomas Besom

In this study, Besom explores the ritual practices of human sacrifice and the worship of mountains, attested in both archaeological investigations and ethnohistorical sources, as tools in the establishment and preservation of political power within the Inka empire.

No Mere Shadows

Faces of Widowhood in Early Colonial Mexico
By Shirley Cushing Flint

Three generations of women in one family are the characters in this intimate historical study of what it meant to be a widow in sixteenth-century Mexico City.

Wellness Beyond Words

Maya Compositions of Speech and Silence in Medical Care
By T. S. Harvey

Responding to the need for in-depth ethnographic studies in cultural and communicative competence, this anthropological account of Maya language use in health care in highland Guatemala explores some of the cultural and linguistic factors that can complicate communication in the practice of medicine.

Like a Bride and Like a Mother

By Rosa Nissán
Translated by Dick Gerdes

Two powerful autobiographical novels of being a Jewish woman in Mexico, dealing with her parents' dictates, and her husband's and family's expectations. The only constant in her life is a need to find her own way.

Calunga and the Legacy of an African Language in Brazil

By Steven Byrd

Steven Byrd’s study provides a comprehensive linguistic description of Calunga based on two years of interviews with speakers of the language. He examines its history and historical context as well as its linguistic context, its sociolinguistic profile, and its lexical and grammatical outlines.

The Roots of Conservatism in Mexico

Catholicism, Society, and Politics in the Mixteca Baja, 1750-1962
By Benjamin T. Smith

The Roots of Conservatism is the first attempt to ask why over the past two centuries so many Mexican peasants have opted to ally with conservative groups rather than their radical counterparts.

Frontier Naturalist

Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas
By Russell M. Lawson

In 1826, Jean Louis Berlandier, a French naturalist, was part of a team sent to explore what is now northern Mexico and the Gulf Coast of Texas. Here, historian Russell Lawson tells the story of this multinational expedition, using Berlandier's copious records as a way of conveying his view of the natural environment.

Conflict in Colonial Sonora

Indians, Priests, and Settlers
By David Yetman

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries northwestern Mexico was the scene of ongoing conflict among three distinct social groups—Indians, religious orders of priests, and settlers. In this study, Yetman examines seven separate instances of such conflict, each of which reveals a different perspective on this complicated world.

Bakers and Basques

A Social History of Bread in Mexico
By Robert Weis

More than a book about bread, Bakers and Basques places food and labor at the center of the upheavals in Mexican history from independence to the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution.

Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico

Edited by Víctor M. Macías-GonzálezAnne Rubenstein

In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history.

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