Latin America

Frontier Naturalist

Jean Louis Berlandier and the Exploration of Northern Mexico and Texas
By Russell M. Lawson

In 1826, Jean Louis Berlandier, a French naturalist, was part of a team sent to explore what is now northern Mexico and the Gulf Coast of Texas. Here, historian Russell Lawson tells the story of this multinational expedition, using Berlandier's copious records as a way of conveying his view of the natural environment.

Conflict in Colonial Sonora

Indians, Priests, and Settlers
By David Yetman

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries northwestern Mexico was the scene of ongoing conflict among three distinct social groups—Indians, religious orders of priests, and settlers. In this study, Yetman examines seven separate instances of such conflict, each of which reveals a different perspective on this complicated world.

Bakers and Basques

A Social History of Bread in Mexico
By Robert Weis

More than a book about bread, Bakers and Basques places food and labor at the center of the upheavals in Mexican history from independence to the aftermath of the Mexican Revolution.

Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico

Edited by Víctor M. Macías-GonzálezAnne Rubenstein

In Masculinity and Sexuality in Modern Mexico, historians and anthropologists explain how evolving notions of the meaning and practice of manhood have shaped Mexican history.

The Mermaid and the Lobster Diver

Gender, Sexuality, and Money on the Miskito Coast
By Laura Hobson Herlihy

Interspersed with short stories, songs, and incantations, The Mermaid and the Lobster Diver demonstrates the archetypes of femininity and masculinity within Miskitu society, highlighting the power associated with women's sexuality-as manifested in both goddess and human form-and the vulnerable position of men.

The Road to Ruins

By Ian Graham

Graham eloquently describes his well-lived life as a traveler, photographer, and Mayanist.

A Harvest of Reluctant Souls

Fray Alonso de Benavides's History of New Mexico, 1630
By Alonso de Benavides
Edited and Translated by Baker H. Morrow

The most thorough account ever written of southwestern life in the early seventeenth century, this engaging book was first published in 1630 as an official report to the king of Spain by Fray Alonso de Benavides, a Portuguese Franciscan who was the third head of the mission churches of New Mexico.

Yanantin and Masintin in the Andean World

Complementary Dualism in Modern Peru
By Hillary S. Webb

Yanantin and Masintin in the Andean World is an eloquently written autoethnography in which researcher Hillary S. Webb seeks to understand the indigenous Andean concept of yanantin or "œcomplementary opposites."

Modernizing Minds in El Salvador

Education Reform and the Cold War, 1960-1980
By Héctor Lindo-FuentesErik Ching

In this thoughtful collaborative study, the authors examine the processes by which education reform in El Salvador in the 1960s and 1970s became entwined in debates over theories of modernization and the politics of anticommunism.

A History of Mining in Latin America

From the Colonial Era to the Present
By Kendall Brown

Brown's focus on the legendary mines at Potosí and comparison of its operations to those of other mines in Latin America is a well-written and accessible study that is the first to span the colonial era to the present.

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