Latin America

Early Churches of Mexico

An Architect's View
By Beverley Spears

Following the Spanish conquest of Mexico in the early 1500s, Franciscan, Dominican, and Augustinian friars fanned out across the central and southern areas of the country, founding hundreds of mission churches and monasteries to evangelize the Native population. This book documents more than 120 of these remarkable sixteenth-century sites in duotone black-and-white photographs.

More Argentine Than You

Arabic-Speaking Immigrants in Argentina
By Steven Hyland Jr.

Hyland shows how Syrians and Lebanese, Christians, Jews, and Muslims adapted to local social and political conditions, entered labor markets, established community institutions, raised families, and attempted to pursue their individual dreams and community goals in early twentieth-century Argentina.

Nuns Navigating the Spanish Empire

By Sarah E. Owens

Nuns Navigating the Spanish Empire tells the remarkable story of a group of nuns who traveled halfway around the globe in the seventeenth century to establish the first female Franciscan convent in the Far East.

A History of Boxing in Mexico

Masculinity, Modernity, and Nationalism
By Stephen D. Allen

This book reveals how boxing and boxers became sources of national pride and sparked debates on what it meant to be Mexican, masculine, and modern.

To Be Indio in Colonial Spanish America

Edited by Mónica Díaz

Focusing on central Mexico and the Andes (colonial New Spain and Peru), the contributors deepen scholarly knowledge of colonial history and literature, emphasizing the different ways people became and lived their lives as “indios” in this new study.

Latin American Women Filmmakers

Social and Cultural Perspectives
By Traci Roberts-Camps

This book highlights the voices and stories of Latin American women directors from Brazil, Chile, Argentina, and Mexico.

Corruption in the Iberian Empires

Greed, Custom, and Colonial Networks
Edited by Christoph Rosenmüller

The contributors use fresh archival research from Spain, Portugal, Brazil, Bolivia, Mexico, and the Philippines to examine the lives of slaves and farmworkers as well as self-serving magistrates, bishops, and traders in contraband.

Masquerade and Social Justice in Contemporary Latin American Fiction

By Helene Carol Weldt-Basson

Using an interdisciplinary approach that combines philosophy, history, psychology, literature, and social justice theory, this study delineates the synergistic connection between masquerade and social justice in Latin American fiction.

The Blood Contingent

The Military and the Making of Modern Mexico, 1876–1911
By Stephen B. Neufeld

This innovative social and cultural history explores the daily lives of the lowest echelons in president Porfirio Díaz’s army through the decades leading up to the 1910 Revolution.

Sarapiquí Chronicle

A Naturalist in Costa Rica
Revised and Expanded Edition
By Allen M. Young

The abundant insect life of the rainforests of northeastern Costa Rica is the subject of this engaging book, first published over twenty-five years ago and now including two new chapters on the rise of ecotourism in the region.

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