Latin America

Correspondence Analysis and West Mexico Archaeology

Ceramics from the Long-Glassow Collection
By C. Roger NanceJan de LeeuwPhil C. WeigandKathleen PradoDavid S. Verity

Because the archaeology of West Mexico has received little attention from researchers, large segments of the region’s prehistoric ceramic sequences have long remained incomplete. This book goes far toward filling that gap by analyzing a collection of potsherds excavated in the 1960s and housed since then, though heretofore unanalyzed, at UCLA.

Cables, Crises, and the Press

The Geopolitics of the New International Information System in the Americas, 1866-1903
By John A. Britton

In recent decades the Internet has played what may seem to be a unique role in international crises. This book reveals an interesting parallel in the late nineteenth century, when a new communications system based on advances in submarine cable technology and newspaper printing brought information to an excitable mass audience.

Buen Gusto and Classicism in the Visual Cultures of Latin America, 1780-1910

Edited by Paul B. NiellStacie G. Widdifield

The promotion of classicism in the visual arts in late eighteenth and nineteenth-century Latin America and the need to “revive” buen gusto (good taste) are the themes of this collection of essays.

Subjects: ArtLatin America

Mexico's Supreme Court

Between Liberal Individual and Revolutionary Social Rights, 1867-1934
By Timothy M. James

James examines the legal history of the Supreme Court’s constitutional jurisprudence before, during, and after the Mexican Revolution of 1910 and explains the ways in which constitutional jurisprudence became the barrier to the implementation of revolutionary social legislation such as land reapportionment after 1917.

Subjects: Latin AmericaLaw

Violent Delights, Violent Ends

Sex, Race, and Honor in Colonial Cartagena de Indias
By Nicole von Germeten

This study of sexuality in seventeenth-century Latin America takes the reader beneath the surface of daily life in a colonial city.

The Grandchildren of Solano López

Frontier and Nation in Paraguay, 1904–1936
By Bridget María Chesterton

Bridget María Chesterton’s in-depth examination of Paraguay’s unique nationalism and the role of the frontier in its formation places the debate over López in the context of larger themes of Latin American history, including racial and ethnic identity, authoritarian regimes, and militarism.

The Bare-toed Vaquero

Life in Baja California's Desert Mountains
By Peter J. Marchand

Marchand’s photographs and text are both informative and intimate. His introduction to this little-known corner of Mexico will delight travelers and scholars alike.

Oy, My Buenos Aires

Jewish Immigrants and the Creation of Argentine National Identity
By Mollie Lewis Nouwen

Between 1905 and 1930, more than one hundred thousand Jews left Central and Eastern Europe to settle permanently in Argentina. This book explores how these Yiddish-speaking Ashkenazi immigrants helped to create a new urban strain of the Argentine national identity.

For God and Revolution

Priest, Peasant, and Agrarian Socialism in the Mexican Huasteca
By Mark Saad Saka

During the early 1880s, a wave of peasant unrest swept the mountainous Huasteca region of northeastern Mexico. This account traces the material and ideological roots of the rebellion to nineteenth-century liberal policies of land privatization and to the growth of a radical anarcho-communist agrarian consciousness.

Knowing History in Mexico

An Ethnography of Citizenship
By Trevor Stack

While much has been written about national history and citizenship, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, Stack pinpoints what it is that makes people who know history seem like better citizens.

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