SAA21

Fire

The Spark That Ignited Human Evolution
By Frances D. Burton

Fire and light, and their impacts on our earliest human ancestor, are the subjects of this innovative study of the development of the species.

Yucatan Through Her Eyes

Alice Dixon Le Plongeon, Writer and Expeditionary Photographer
By Lawrence Desmond

The biography and photographs of this talented and adventurous woman are accompanied here by her previously unpublished diary.

Moche Art and Visual Culture in Ancient Peru

By Margaret Jackson

This multidisciplinary study analyzes the visual, linguistic, and cultural significance of the imagery used by the Moche in their ceramics and murals.

Memory Work

Archaeologies of Material Practices
Edited by Barbara J. MillsWilliam H. Walker

Memory making is a social practice that links people and things together across time and space and ultimately has material consequences. The intersection of matter and social practice becomes archaeologically visible through the deposits created during social activities. The contributors to this volume share a common goal to map out the different ways in which to study social memories in past societies programmatically and tangibly.

Subjects: ArchaeologySAA21

Digging for Dollars

American Archaeology and the New Deal
By Paul Fagette

Fagette's book is a thorough, compelling history of American archaeology in its most critical decade, the 1930s.

Opening Archaeology

Repatriation's Impact on Contemporary Research and Practice
Edited by Thomas W. Killion

In 1989–90, Congress enacted two laws, the National Museum of the American Indian Act and the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, that required museums and other repositories of Native American human remains and cultural items to consult with, share information about, and return some items to federally recognized Indian tribes and Native Alaskan and Hawaiian communities.

Pottery and Practice

The Expression of Identity at Pottery Mound and Hummingbird Pueblo
By Suzanne Eckert

Eckert illustrates how the relationship between ethnicity, migration, and ritual practice combined to create a complexly patterned material culture among residents of two fourteenth-century Pueblo villages.

The Chaco Experience

Landscape and Ideology at the Center Place
By Ruth M. Van Dyke

In a remote canyon in northwest New Mexico, thousand-year-old sandstone walls waver in the sunlight, stretching like ancient vertebrae against a turquoise sky. This storied place—Chaco Canyon—carries multiple layers of meaning for Native Americans and archaeologists, writers and tourists, explorers and artists.

The Model-Based Archaeology of Socionatural Systems

Edited by Timothy KohlerSander E. van der Leeuw

How should archaeologists and other social scientists tackle the big and little questions about change in socionatural systems? Although fieldwork is certainly the place to start, it alone is not enough to answer troublesome "how" or "why" questions. To make sense of what they find in the field, archaeologists build models-possible explanations for the data.

Subjects: ArchaeologySAA21

Space and Spatial Analysis in Archaeology

Edited by Elizabeth C. RobertsonJeffery SeibertDeepika FernandezMarc Zender

The archaeology of space and place is examined in this selection of papers from the 34th annual Chacmool Archaeological Conference.

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