Anthropology

Spider Woman

A Story of Navajo Weavers and Chanters
By Gladys Reichard

This lively account of a pioneering anthropologist's experiences with a Navajo family grew out of the author's desire to learn to weave as a way of participating in Navajo culture rather than observing it from the outside.

Senses of Place

Edited by Steven FeldKeith H. Basso

The complex relationship of people to places has come under increasing scholarly scrutiny in recent years as acute global conditions of exile, displacement, and inflamed borders-to say nothing of struggles by indigenous peoples and cultural minorities for ancestral homelands, land rights, and retention of sacred places-have brought the political question of place into sharp focus.

Subjects: Anthropology

Wisdom Sits in Places

Landscape and Language Among the Western Apache
By Keith H. Basso

Explores the connections of place, language, wisdom, and morality among the Western Apache.

Last Hunters, First Farmers

New Perspectives on the Prehistoric Transition to Agriculture
Edited by T. Douglas PriceAnne Birgitte Gebauer

In case studies ranging from the Far East to the American Southwest, the authors of Last Hunters-First Farmers provide a global perspective on contemporary research into the origins of agriculture. Downplaying more traditional explanations of the turn to agriculture, such as the influence of marginal environments and population pressures, the authors emphasize instead the importance of the resource-rich areas in which agriculture began, the complex social organizations already in place, the role of sedentism, and, in some locales, the advent of economic intensification and competition.

Other Intentions

Cultural Contexts and the Attribution of Inner States
Edited by Lawrence Rosen

The authors argue that although intentionality might appear to be a wholly abstract phenomenon, it is deeply entwined with the nature and distribution of power, the portrayal of events, the assessment of personhood, the interplay of trust and deception, and the assessment of moral and legal responsibility.

Subjects: Anthropology

Yanomami Warfare

A Political History
By R. Brian Ferguson

Generations of college students know the Yanomami as the example of "natural" aggression in human society. These reputedly isolated people have been portrayed as fiercely engaging in constant warfare over women, status, and revenge. Ferguson argues persuasively that the Yanomami make war not because Western influence is absent, but because it is present.

The Information Continuum

Evolution of Social Information Transfer in Monkeys, Apes, and Hominids
By Barbara J. King

The Information Continuum creates a synthetic view of the evolution of communication among primates. King contends that the crucial element in the evolution of information acquisition and transfer is the acquired ability to donate information to others.

Subjects: Anthropology

Memory, History, and Opposition under State Socialism

Edited by Rubie S. Watson

Eight anthropologists, sociologists, and historians probe the oppositional narratives created by Chinese rural intellectuals, èmigrè Croats, and organized dissenters such as the Djilas of Yugoslavia who constructed and maintained oppositional histories in state socialist societies.

Living Life's Circle

Mescalero Apache Cosmovision
By Claire Farrer

Themes in Southwest Prehistory

Edited by George J. Gumerman

Two dozen leading archaeologists isolate a number of themes that were central to the process of increasing complexity in prehistoric Southwestern society, including increased food production, a greater degree of sedentism, and a dramatically increasing population.

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