Anthropology

Disturbing Bodies

Perspectives on Forensic Anthropology
Edited by Zoë CrosslandRosemary A. Joyce

The theme of “disturbing bodies” has a double valence, evoking both the work that anthropologists do and also the ways in which the dead can, in turn, disturb the living through their material qualities, through dreams and other forms of presence, and through the political claims often articulated around them.

Subjects: Anthropology

Huichol Women, Weavers, and Shamans

By Stacy B. Schaefer

“A beautiful ethnographic work. Schaefer deftly relates mythology, cosmology, family life, and economics within the spiritual practice and mechanics of weaving. There is clearly a preservation ethos underlying Schaefer’s work, yet her depiction is not mournful, it is celebratory.”— Ethnohistory

Things in Motion

Object Itineraries in Anthropological Practice
Edited by Rosemary A. JoyceSusan D. Gillespie

Complementing the concept of object biography, the contributors to this volume use the complex construct of “itineraries” to trace the places in which objects come to rest or are active, the routes through which things circulate, and the means by which they are moved.

Community Health Narratives

A Reader
Edited by Emily MendenhallKathy Wollner
Illustrations by Hannah Adams Burque

Community Health Narratives: A Reader along with its companions Global Health Narratives: A Reader for Youth and Environmental Health Narratives: A Reader for Youth (UNM Press), provides a comprehensive curriculum that examines people’s health experiences across cultures and nations.

Fixing the Books

Secrecy, Literacy, and Perfectibility in Indigenous New Mexico
By Erin Debenport

In Fixing the Books, professor Erin Debenport (anthropology, University of New Mexico) presents the research she conducted on an indigenous language literacy effort within a New Mexico Pueblo community, and the potential of that literacy to compromise Pueblo secrecy.

Spiritual Currency in Northeast Brazil

By Lindsey King

This book examines the spiritual community of the followers of St. Francis of Wounds in the town of Canindé in northeast Brazil.

Bioinsecurity and Vulnerability

Edited by Nancy N. ChenLesley A. Sharp

“Biosecurity” has ballooned into an increasingly mundane aspect of human experience, serving as a catchall for the detection, surveillance, containment, and deflection of everything from epidemics and natural disasters to resource scarcities and political insurgencies.

Mayan Tales from Chiapas, Mexico

By Robert M. Laughlin
Translated by Socorro Gómez HernándezJuan Benito de la Torre

Presented here in English, Tzotzil, and Spanish are forty-two stories told to Robert Laughlin in Tzotzil by the only speaker of Tzotzil left in the village of San Felipe Ecatepec in Chiapas, Mexico. The stories range from mythological sacred stories to historical accounts of life in the twentieth century.

Maya Pilgrimage to Ritual Landscapes

Insights from Archaeology, History, and Ethnography
By Joel W. Palka

Through cross-cultural comparisons, archaeological data, and ethnographic insights, Joel W. Palka addresses central questions about Maya pilgrimage practice and discusses the broad importance of Maya ritual landscapes and pilgrimage for Mesoamerica as a whole.

Imagining Geronimo

An Apache Icon in Popular Culture
By William M. Clements

Clements’s study examines Americans’ changing sense of Geronimo and looks at the ways Geronimo tried to maintain control of his own image during more than twenty years in which he was a prisoner of war.

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