Anthropology

(Mis)managing Migration

Guestworkers' Experiences with North American Labor Markets
Edited by David Griffith

Today managed migration is growing in North America. This mirrors the general growth of migration from poorer to richer countries, with more than 200 million people now living outside their natal countries. Faced with this phenomenon, managed migration enables nation-states to regulate those population movements; direct foreign nationals to specific, identified economic sectors that citizens are less likely to care about; match employers who claim labor shortages with highly motivated workers; and offer people from poorer countries higher earning potential abroad through temporary absence from their families and homelands.

Subjects: Anthropology

Cash on the Table

Markets, Values, and Moral Economies
Edited by Edward F. Fischer

A great deal is at stake in understanding the moral dimensions of economic behavior and markets. Public debates over executive compensation, the fair trade movement, and recent academic inquiries into the limitations of rational-choice paradigms all point to the relevance of moral values in our economic decision-making processes. Moral values inform economic behavior.

Indian Policies in the Americas

from Columbus to Collier and Beyond
By William Y. Adams

In Indian Policies in the Americas, Adams addresses the idea that “the Indian,” as conceived by colonial powers and later by different postcolonial interest groups, was as much ideology as empirical reality. Adams surveys the policies of the various colonial and postcolonial powers, then reflects upon the great ideological, moral, and intellectual issues that underlay those policies.

Otros Saberes

Collaborative Research on Indigenous and Afro-Descendant Cultural Politics
Edited by Charles R. HaleLynn Stephen

The six research projects that form the core of the Otros Saberes initiative bring together a diverse group of Afro-descendant and indigenous collaborations with academics. The focus of each research project is driven by a strategic priority in the life of the community, organization, or social movement concerned. This book, written in English, Spanish, and Portuguese, provides an explanation of the key analytical questions and findings of each project.

Street Economies in the Urban Global South

Edited by Karen Tranberg HansenWalter E. LittleB. Lynne Milgram

This book focuses on the economic, political, social, and cultural dynamics of street economies across the urban Global South. Although contestations over public space have a long history, Street Economies in the Urban Global South presents the argument that the recent conjuncture of neoliberal economic policies and unprecedented urban growth in the Global South has changed the equation.

Subjects: Anthropology

Correspondence Analysis and West Mexico Archaeology

Ceramics from the Long-Glassow Collection
By C. Roger NanceJan de LeeuwPhil C. WeigandKathleen PradoDavid S. Verity

Because the archaeology of West Mexico has received little attention from researchers, large segments of the region’s prehistoric ceramic sequences have long remained incomplete. This book goes far toward filling that gap by analyzing a collection of potsherds excavated in the 1960s and housed since then, though heretofore unanalyzed, at UCLA.

The Bare-toed Vaquero

Life in Baja California's Desert Mountains
By Peter J. Marchand

Marchand’s photographs and text are both informative and intimate. His introduction to this little-known corner of Mexico will delight travelers and scholars alike.

Anthropology of Race

Genes, Biology, and Culture
Edited by John Hartigan

What do we know about race today? After years of debate and inquiry by anthropologists, the question remains fraught with emotion and the answer remains complicated and uncertain. Anthropology of Race confronts the challenge of formulating an effective rejoinder to new arguments and new data about race, and attempts to address the intense desire to understand race and why it matters.

Subjects: Anthropology

Vital Relations

Modernity and the Persistent Life of Kinship
Edited by Susan McKinnonFenella Cannell

For more than 150 years, theories of social evolution, development, and modernity have been unanimous in their assumption that kinship organizes simpler, “traditional,” pre-state societies but not complex, “modern,” state societies. And these theories have been unanimous in their presupposition that within modern state-based societies kinship has been relegated to the domestic domain, has lost its economic and political functions, has retained no organizing force in modern political and economic structures and processes, and has become secularized and rationalized. Vital Relations challenges these notions.

Subjects: Anthropology

Knowing History in Mexico

An Ethnography of Citizenship
By Trevor Stack

While much has been written about national history and citizenship, anthropologist Trevor Stack focuses on the history and citizenship of towns and cities. Basing his inquiry on fieldwork near Guadalajara in west Mexico, Stack pinpoints what it is that makes people who know history seem like better citizens.

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