Anthropology

Images That Move

Edited by Patricia SpyerMary Margaret Steedly

Images play a significant part in projects of “poetic world-making” and political transformation. They participate in the production of commensuration or of incommensurability, enact moments of prophecy or exposure, and attract or repel spectators’ attention. But any examination of images in motion must also recognize the blockages and breakdowns that prevent their movement, as well as the enframings or “stickinesses” that trap them in particular places and prevent them from reaching others.

Subjects: Anthropology

Sandals of the Basketmaker and Pueblo Peoples

Fabric Structure and Color Symmetry
By Lynn Shuler TeagueDorothy K. Washburn

The decorated sandals worn by prehistoric southwesterners with their complex fiber structures and designs have been dissected, described, and interpreted for a century. Nevertheless, these artifacts remain mysterious in many respects. Teague and Washburn examine these sandals as sources of information on the history of the people known as the Basketmakers.

Indigenous Religion and Cultural Performance in the New Maya World

By Garrett W. CookThomas A. Offit

Based on more than thirty years of ethnographic fieldwork in Highland Guatemala, this study of Maya diviners, shamans, ritual dancers, and religious brotherhoods describes the radical changes in traditional Maya religious practice wrought by economic globalization and political turmoil.

Reassembling the Collection

Ethnographic Museums and Indigenous Agency
Edited by Rodney HarrisonSarah ByrneAnne Clarke

Reassembling the Collection presents innovative approaches to the study of historical and contemporary engagements between museums and the various individuals and communities who were (and are) involved in their production and consumption.

Subjects: Anthropology

An Archaeology of Architecture

Photowriting the Built Environment
By Dennis Tedlock

Page by page, this book takes us on a journey through the built world that ranges from Greece to Guatemala and from New York to San Francisco. Tedlock practices what he calls photowriting, a creative process that brings photographer and writer together in the same person.

Inka Human Sacrifice and Mountain Worship

Strategies for Empire Unification
By Thomas Besom

In this study, Besom explores the ritual practices of human sacrifice and the worship of mountains, attested in both archaeological investigations and ethnohistorical sources, as tools in the establishment and preservation of political power within the Inka empire.

Wellness Beyond Words

Maya Compositions of Speech and Silence in Medical Care
By T. S. Harvey

Responding to the need for in-depth ethnographic studies in cultural and communicative competence, this anthropological account of Maya language use in health care in highland Guatemala explores some of the cultural and linguistic factors that can complicate communication in the practice of medicine.

No Deal!

Indigenous Arts and the Politics of Possession
Edited by Tressa Berman

No Deal! encompasses a diverse group of artists, curators, art historians, and anthropologists from Australia and North America in order to investigate social relations of possession through the artifacts and motifs of Indigenous expressive culture. The contributors speak from the standpoints of Indigenous systems of knowledge as well as from western epistemologies and their institutions, interrogating what it means to “own culture.” The case studies in this volume contribute to notions of “ownership” and “possession” through the lens of art and its associated rights to production, circulation, performance, and representation.

Subjects: ArtAnthropology

Calunga and the Legacy of an African Language in Brazil

By Steven Byrd

Steven Byrd’s study provides a comprehensive linguistic description of Calunga based on two years of interviews with speakers of the language. He examines its history and historical context as well as its linguistic context, its sociolinguistic profile, and its lexical and grammatical outlines.

Conflict in Colonial Sonora

Indians, Priests, and Settlers
By David Yetman

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries northwestern Mexico was the scene of ongoing conflict among three distinct social groups—Indians, religious orders of priests, and settlers. In this study, Yetman examines seven separate instances of such conflict, each of which reveals a different perspective on this complicated world.

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