Anthropology

No Deal!

Indigenous Arts and the Politics of Possession
Edited by Tressa Berman

No Deal! encompasses a diverse group of artists, curators, art historians, and anthropologists from Australia and North America in order to investigate social relations of possession through the artifacts and motifs of Indigenous expressive culture. The contributors speak from the standpoints of Indigenous systems of knowledge as well as from western epistemologies and their institutions, interrogating what it means to “own culture.” The case studies in this volume contribute to notions of “ownership” and “possession” through the lens of art and its associated rights to production, circulation, performance, and representation.

Subjects: ArtAnthropology

Calunga and the Legacy of an African Language in Brazil

By Steven Byrd

Steven Byrd’s study provides a comprehensive linguistic description of Calunga based on two years of interviews with speakers of the language. He examines its history and historical context as well as its linguistic context, its sociolinguistic profile, and its lexical and grammatical outlines.

Conflict in Colonial Sonora

Indians, Priests, and Settlers
By David Yetman

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries northwestern Mexico was the scene of ongoing conflict among three distinct social groups—Indians, religious orders of priests, and settlers. In this study, Yetman examines seven separate instances of such conflict, each of which reveals a different perspective on this complicated world.

Environmental Health Narratives

A Reader for Youth
Edited by Emily MendenhallAdam Koon
Illustrations by Hannah Adams Burque

Written to draw attention to problems and solutions in environmental health across the world, the stories in this collection are about young people trying to make sense of the complex environments in which they live.

Keystone Nations

Indigenous Peoples and Salmon across the North Pacific
Edited by Benedict J. ColombiJames F. Brooks

The histories and futures of Indigenous peoples and salmon are inextricably bound across the vast ocean expanse and rugged coastlines of the North Pacific. Keystone Nations addresses this enmeshment and the marriage of the biological and social sciences that have led to the research discussed in this book.

Subjects: Anthropology

The Global Middle Classes

Theorizing through Ethnography
Edited by Rachel HeimanCarla FreemanMark Liechty

Surging middle-class aspirations and anxieties throughout the world have recently compelled anthropologists to pay serious attention to middle classes and middle-class spaces, sentiments, lifestyles, labors, and civic engagements.

The Road to Ruins

By Ian Graham

Graham eloquently describes his well-lived life as a traveler, photographer, and Mayanist.

The Mermaid and the Lobster Diver

Gender, Sexuality, and Money on the Miskito Coast
By Laura Hobson Herlihy

Interspersed with short stories, songs, and incantations, The Mermaid and the Lobster Diver demonstrates the archetypes of femininity and masculinity within Miskitu society, highlighting the power associated with women's sexuality-as manifested in both goddess and human form-and the vulnerable position of men.

Yanantin and Masintin in the Andean World

Complementary Dualism in Modern Peru
By Hillary S. Webb

Yanantin and Masintin in the Andean World is an eloquently written autoethnography in which researcher Hillary S. Webb seeks to understand the indigenous Andean concept of yanantin or "œcomplementary opposites."

Nature, Science, and Religion

Intersections Shaping Society and the Environment
Edited by Catherine M. Tucker

This book is about the complicated and provocative ways nature, science, and religion intersect in real settings where people attempt to live in harmony with the physical environment. The contributors explore how scientific knowledge and spiritual beliefs are engaged to shape natural resource management, environmental activism, and political processes.

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